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Ml N UTES 



SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL MEETING 



Baptist State Convention 



NORTH CAROLINA 



ASHEVILLE, N. C, December 6-i0, 1899 



CONTENTS 



OflBcers 
Boards _ 



Constitution 



3 

^ 5 

Messengers 8 

Proceedings 15 

Ordained Ministers and Statistic- 79 



RALEIGH, N. C. 

Presses of Edwards & Broughton 

1899 



OFFICERS. 

PRESIDENT : 

Rev. E. H. Marsh, D. D Oxford, N. C. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS : 

J. H. Tucker Asheville, N. C. 

Ltcurgus Hofler - Gatesville, N. C. 

W. K Jones Raleigh, N. C. 

secretary : 
N. B. Bkoughton Raleigh, ,N. C. 

assistant secretary : 
Hight C. Moore New Bern, N. C. 

treasurer : 
J. D. BousHALL Raleigh, N. C. 

assistant treasurer : 
J. M. Stoner. .. Asheville, N. C. 

auditor : 
Walters Durham Raleigh, N. C. 

corresponding secretary : 
John E. White Raleigh, N. C. 

trustees : 

W. C. Tyree Durham, N. C. 

C. M. Cooke Louisburg, N. C. 

Livingston Johnson Greensboro, N. C. 

T. H. Briggs - Raleigh, K C. 

L. R. Mills Wake Forest, N. 0. 



BOARDS OF THE CONVENTION, 

For 1899-1900. 

BOARD OF MISSIONS AND SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

John E. Ray, Chairman; John E. White, Corresponding Secretary; 
J. H. Alford, G. M. Allen. J. S. Allen. J. D, Boushall. C. B. Edwards. 
A. D. Hunter, J. B. Boone, J. M. Brougliton, A. B. Forrest, S. W. 
Brewer. N. B. Broughton. J. C. Caddell. H. W. Norris. W. C. Douglass, 
J. C. Ellington, W. R. Gwaltney, F. P. Hobgood, J. N. Holding, E. C. 
HoUeman. C. J. Hunter, W. N. Jones. J. C. Scarborough, T. E. Skin- 
ner, A. M. Simms. H. L. Watson. J. D. Hufham, H. C. Dockery, C. M. 
Cooke, W. L. Poteat, John T. PuUen. J. W. Bailey. J. B. Brewer, J. S. 
Hardaway, J. P. Wyatt, B. W. Spilman. A. C. Barron. J. A. Mundy, 
R. N. Simms. W. R. CuUom. E. P. Moses, W. W. Vafte, T. J. Taylor, 
T. M. Pittman. W. C. Petty, A. H. Harnley. T. B. Moseley, W. M. Vines. 
T. M. Honeycutt, A. I. Justice, R. A. Sentell, A. H. Sims. 

ASSOCIATIONAL DELEGATES. 

Alleghany and Grayson, W. C. Fields; Ashe and Alleghany, J. Ellis; 
Atlantic, Hight C. Moore; Alexander, L. P Gwaltney; Beulah, J. E. 
Jordan: Bladen, Wm. Brunt; Brier Creek, D. C. Jarvis; Brushy Moun- 
tain, J. L. Hemphill; Buncombe. L. B. McBrayer; Cnldwell, J. V. Mc- 
Call; Carolina, T. J. Rickman; Cedar Creek. R. W. Horrell; Central, 
P. A. Dunn; Cataivoa River, S. J. Porter; Cape Fear, A. H. Porter; 
Chowan, T. B. Boushall; Eastern, L. R. Carroll; Elkin, J. W. Burchett. 
iTrap Hill); Flat River, T. H. Street; French Broad, W. P. Jervis: 
Green River, W. M. Whitesides; Hayicood, J. L. Morgan, Kings Moun- 
tain, G. M. Webb; Liberty. C. M. Wall; Liberty and Ducktown, J. F. 
McGee; Little River, J. M. Holleman; Mecklenburg andCabarrus, R. H. 
Jordan; Mitchell. L. H. Green, (Bakersville) ; Montgomery. W. L. 
Wright; Mt. Zion, W. C. Tyree; Neiv Found. R. H. Hipps; Pee Dee, 
W. J. Ferrell; Piedmont, B,. W. Brooks; Pilot Mountain, H. A. Brown; 
Raleigh, J. T. Holt; Robeson, E. K. Proctor, Jr.; Sandy Creek, D. C. 
Britt; South Fork, W. A. Graham ; Sou^/i River, John A. Oates, Jr.; South 
Yadkin. E. S. Reeves; Stanly, E. F. Eddins; Stone Mountain, J. S. 
Kilby; Tar River, N. Biggs; Tennessee River, J. S. Woodard; Three 
Forks, W. S. Farthing; Transylvania, E. Allison; Tuckaseigee, T. C. 
Bryson; Union, A. M. Croxton; West Choivan, T. T. Speight; Western 
North Carolina, J. T. Plott; Yadkin, V. M. Swaim; Yancey County 
Association, B. B. Riddle; Neuse, C. W. Blanchard. 



4 BOARDS OF THK CONVENTION. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL AND COLPORTAGE COMMITTEE. 

N. B. BroughtOD, Chairmuv ; Jno. E. White. W. N.Jones, R. N. Simms, 
John E. Ray, S. W. Brewer, W. C. Douglass. W. L. Poteat. John T. 
PuUen. J. D. Boushall, J. W. Bailey. J. C. Caddell, J. M. Broughton, 
J. B. Brewer. W. R. Cullom. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

C. E. Taylor. J. W. Lynch. W. L. Poteat. J. F. Lanneau, W. B. Roy- 
all. John Mitchell. D. W. Allen. W. R. Cullom, C. E. Brewer, J. C. 
Caddell, J. M. Brewer, T. E. Holding. J. B. Carlyle, J. H. Gorrell, 
W. B. Dunn, B. F. Sledd. J. L. Lake. W. B. Daniel. J. C. Fowler, P. W. 
Johnson. W. C. Parker. L. R. Mills. J. B. Brewer, J. B. Powers, R. E. 
Royall. F. M Purefoy. N. Y. GuUey, E. W. Sikes. 



MINISTERIAL RELIEF BOARD. 

W. C. Tyree. President ; T. E. Cheek, Secretary and Treasurer: J. F. 
MacDuffie, Corresponding Secretary; C. J. D. Parker, O. C. Horton. 
J. V. Rigsbee, H. A. Foushee. J. S. Hardaway, A. H. Rigsbee, D. L. 
(iore. J. P. Timberlake. 



ORPHANAGE BOARD. 

John Mitchell, President ; John B. Brewer. W. R Gwaltney, H. F. 
Schenck, J. D. Brevard. Henry C. Dockery. J. S. Montague. Thomas 
Carrick. J. H. Lassiter, F. P. Hobgood. Noah Biggs. M. L. Kesler, E. 
Frost, Dennis Simmons, John C. Scarborough, R. W. Brooks, John 
E. Ray, Stephen Mclntyre. 



TRUSTEES OF BAPTIST FEMALE UNIVERSITY. 

W. C. Petty, President; N. B. Broughton, Secretary ; C. J. Hunter. 
Chairman Executive Committee : O. L. Stringfield, Financial Secretary; 
C. M. Cooke, F. H. Briggs. W. N. Jones. John E. Ray, A. M. Simms, 
E. McK. Goodwin, J. N. Holding. W. J. Hicks. W. L. Poteat, W. C. 
Tyree, S. W. Brewer, J. D. Boushall, J. B. Brewer, M. L. Kesler, J, Y. 
Joyner, J. W. Bailey, J. E. White. R. T. Vann. J. W. Carter. H. B. 
Duffy. 



CONSTITUTION. 



1. The Baptist State Convention shall be composed of three male 
representatives from each white Association in the State and one 
annual male representative appointed by the churches for every ten 
dollars contributed to its funds, and of such male life members as 
have been made so by the payment of thirty dollars at any one time 
to the Treasurer, for the objects of the Convention. No church shall 
have more than ten representatives. No one shall be a member of 
the Convention who is not a member in good standing of a Baptist 
Church in fellowship with us, and no other life member shall be 
made. 

2. The primary objects of the Convention shall be to encourage 
and support Wake Forest College; to educate young men called of 
God to the ministry, and approved by the churches to which they 
belong: to encourage education among all the people of the State; 
to support the gospel in all the destitute sections of the State and 
of the Southern Baptist Convention; to send the gospel to the nations 
who have it not; to encourage the distribution and study of the 
Bible and a sound religious literature; to assist Baptist Churches in 
the erection of suitable houses of worship; to encourage the proper 
care of indigent orphan children and destitute and aged ministers 
of the gospel, and to cooperate with the Southern Baptist Convention 
in all its departments of labor. 

3. This Convention shall meet annually, on Wednesday after the 
first Sunday in December. 

4. The olBcers of the Convention shall be a Prpsitlent, ihree Vice- 
Presidents, a Recording Secretary and an Assistant, a Corresponding 
Secretary, a Treasurer, and Auditor, and five Trustees, all of whom, 
except the Trustees (who shall serve during the pleasure of the Con- 
vention), shall be elected annually. 

5. The President shall preside and enforce order in accordance 
with Dr. Kerfoot's Parliamentary Law. One of the Vice-Presidents 
shall preside in the absence of the President. 

6. The Recording Secretary and his Assistant shall record the 
proceedings, collect and preserve statistics of the denomination, and 
publish and distribute the Minutes. 

7. The Treasurer shall receive all funds represented in the Con- 
vention; make public acknowledgment of the same each week 
through the BibUccn Recorder: give his bond to the Trustees; for- 



6 CONSTITUTION. 

ward, at least once a month, all contributions to their destination; 
at every naeeting of the Convention make a full report of his 
receipts and disbursements, and, on retiring from his ofBce, turn over 
to his successor all moneys, papers and books belonging thereto. 

8. The Trustees shall secure and hold the title to any and all 
property belonging to or which may be acquired by the Convention, 
and take a sufficient bond of the Treasurer. • The terms, conditions 
and amount of the bond shall be fixed by the Trustees, and in case 
the Treasurer shall refuse or neglect to give his bond within thirty 
days after his election, the Trustees shall have power to elect a 
Treasurer. They shall report annually to the Convention. 

9. The Auditor shall, prior to each annual meeting of the Con- 
vention, examine carefully all the receipts, disbursements, vouchers, 
papers and books of the Treasurer, and his certificate to the facts 
in the case shall be attached to the Treasurer's report. 

10. The Corresponding Secretary shall solicit contributions to the 
objects of the Convention; assist the Board of Missions and Sunday 
Schools in the employment and payment of missionaries, and labor 
to promote the cultivation and development of Christian benevolence. 

11. The Education Board shall, so far as it may be able, assist 
promising and indigent young ministers seeking to prepare them- 
selves for the more efficient preaching of the gospel. 

12. The Board of Missions and Sunday Schools shall encourage the 
churches to give liberally to all the objects of the Convention, so far 
as the means at its disposal will allow; supply all destitute portions 
of the State with faithful and efficient ministers of the gospel; give 
pecuniary aid, as far as can be secured, for building houses of 
worship at proper points in the State, and in cases where pecuniary 
aid can not be given, commend them lo the beneficence of the 
churches; encourage the distribution and study of the Bible and a 
sound religious literature in the homes, in the churches and in the 
Sunday Schools; encourage Sunday School Conventions and Insti- 
tutes; continue, and so far as it may be able and the growth of 
this work may require, enlarge the Baptist Book Store, and cooperate 
with all missionary and Sunday School work of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention. 

13. A committee of fifteen members of the Board of Missions and 
Sunday Schools shall be appointed, to whom shall be entrusted the 
Sunday School and Colportage work conducted by the Convention, 
the committee to be selected by the Convention annually. It shall 
be the duty of the committee to manage the Baptist Book Store at 
Raleigh, and to them shall be committed the appointment of a Sun- 
day School Secretary, or Secretaries, to prosecute the Sunday School 



CONSTITUTION. 7 

work within the bounds of the Convention. The committee shall 
provide for establishing new Sunday Schools and increasing the 
efficiency of existing Sunday Schools, for holding Sunday School 
Institutes in the different Associations of the Convention, and to 
organize the Baptist Sunday School workers of the State. The com- 
mittee is directed 10 report to the Board of Missions and Sunday 
Schools, and through them to the tJaptist atate Convention annually. 

14. There shall be an Auditor of the Baptist Book Store, who, prior 
to each annual meeting of the Convention, shall examine carefully 
all the receipts, disbursements and expenditures, vouchers, papers, 
books and stock on hand, and his certificate to the facts in the 
case shall be attached to the report on the Book Store. 

15.. The Boards shall be appointed annually, and report to each ses- 
sion of the Convention. 

16. The Convention year shall close one week before the annual 
meeting of the body. 

17. The Boards of the Convention shall fix the compensation of 
their respective officers, and that of the Treasurer and Correspond- 
ing Secretary of the Convention. 

18. The Constitution may be changed or amended at any annual 
session by two-thirds of the representatives present voting in the 
affirmative. 



LIST OF MESSENGERS. 



ALEXANDER COUNTY ASSOCIATION. 

Taylorsville — .J. A. White, A. C. Payne. 

ATLANTIC ASSOCIATION. 

Middle Street, New Bern — Hight C. Moore. 

Morehead City — A. W. Setzer. 

Smyrna — R. D. Carroll, Davis. 

Swansboro — C. B. Paul. 

Tabernacle, New Bern — A. H. Harnley. 

BEULAH ASSOCIATIO.V. 

Ephesiis — Wm. M. Faulkner, Harmony, Va. 
Kerr's Chapel— A. B. Walker, Stony Creek. 

L. N. Chappell, Milton. 

Yanceyville — B. S. Graves. 

BRUSHY MOUNTAIN AS.SOCIATION. 

First Church. North Wilkesboro—W. R. Bradshaw, H. W. Horton. 

ISrNCO.MBE COUNTY ASSOCIATION. 

Antioch — J. H. Woodward and M. S. Proffitt, Democrat. 

Beaver Dam — J. H. atradley, W. Haynes, and E. P. Stradley, of 
Asheville; T. L. Brown. Juno; .J. T. Justice, Grace. 

Berea—T. C. King, Riceville. 

Cane Creek— W. T. Wray. J. A. Wray, R. A. Morgan and A. H. 
Pinkerton, of Fairview. 

Fern Hill — 1. M. Hamrick, Fairview. 

First Church. Asheville— W. M. Vines, J. R. Patterson, J. M. Stoner, 
J. H. Tucker, W. C. Stradley, W. C. McConnell, J. P. Howatt, J. C. 
Martin. 

Flat Creek— W. R. Roberts. Stocksville. 

French Broad, Asheville — C. H. Durham. 

Hominy — Levi S. Clark. Candler. 

Morgan Hill — James N. Morgan, W. T. Bradley. 

Mount Carinel — L. Plemmons, Owenby, and F. Sluder, Juno. 

Spring Mountain — S. F. Moore, Fairview. 

Weaverville — S. C. Roberson. 

West End. Asheville — J. F. Vines, A. E. Brown, T. L. Pemmel. W. J. 
Hough, J. B. Grise, W. A. Hayes. 



LIST OF MESSENGERS. o 

CALDWELL COUNTY ASSOCIATION. 

Olohe — William Millican Moore, Cora. 

Lenoir — J. G. Pulliam, I. W. Thomas, J. K. Moose. 

CAPE FEAR AND COLUMBUS ASSOCIATION. 

Lennon's X Roads — A. H. Porter, Orton. 
Whiteville—J. T. Betts. 

CAROLINA ASSOCIATIOxN'. 

Green Mountain — J. B. Freeman and A. I. Justice, Fruitland. 

Henclersonville — Wm. L. Richards, J. A. Maddrey, A. B. Freeman, 
J. M. Maddrey, I. Buckner, Thomas J. Rickman. 

Mills River — J. L. Whitaker, Pink Bed. 

Mount Gilead — J. S. Rhodes, Angelin, and J. A. Hooper, Mills 
River. 

Mount Moriah — John n. Justice, Blue Ridge. 

CATAWBA RIVER ASSOCIATION. 

Mull Chapel— W. F. Hull, Mull Grove. 

Morganton — S. J. Porter, J. A. Rector, Samuel Huffman, Hi. McK. 
Goodwin. 

North Cataivba — 0. L. Hoffman, Baker. 

CENTRAL ASSOCIATION. 

Franklinton — A. A. Butler. 

Perry's Chapel — R. 0. Pernell, Franklinton. 

Raleigh, First Church— J. W. Bailey, J. E. Ray, C. F. Meserve, 
J. L. Kesler, J. D. Boushall, T. E. Skinner, C. J. Hunter, W. N. Jones. 

Wake Forest— J. W. Lynch, C. E. Taylor, John Mitchell, J. C. Cad- 
dell, J. B. Carlyle, J. L. Lake. 

CHOWAN ASSOCIATION. 

Edenton — G. N. Cowan. 

Gatesville — Lycurgus Hofler. 

Reynoldson — W. B. Waff. 

Sawyer's Creek — Joe S. Sanderlin and Thomas G. Wood, Belcross. 

EASTERN ASSOCIATION. 

Brooklyn — J. J. Payseur, Wilmington. 
Clinton — John J. Douglass. 
Southside — R. H. Herring, Wilmington. 
Wilmington. First Church — C. S. Blackwell. 

FLAT RIVER ASSOCIATION. 

Enon — B. F. Hester, Oxford. 

Estes Church — E. H. Pruitt, Oxford. 

Hester's— J. B. Pruitt, D. H. Pruitt, Oxford. 

O.rford—R. H. Marsh. J. S. Hardaw.iv. J. A. Stradlev. 



lo LIST OF mkssf:ngers. 

FRENCH BKOAD ASSOCIATION. 

Madison Seminary — Jesse Wallin, Marshall. 

Mars Hill — W. E. Wilkins, R. L. Moore, W. F. Robinson, T. M. 
Honeycutt, L. C. Hough, J. R. Sams. 
Paint Gap — C. C. Metcalf, Briggsville. 

GREEN RIVER ASSOCIATION. 

Clear Creek — J. C. Sorrels, Garden City. 
Eureka — Z. T. Whiteside, Eure. 
Marion — M. M. Landrum, Fingerville, S. C. 

Rutherfordton — W. M. Whiteside, C. B. Justice, T. B. Justice; 
H. D. Harrill, Forest City. 

HAYWOOD COUNTY AS.SOCIATION. 

Clyde — R. A. Sen tell, Waynesville. 
Locust Field — L. N. Pinner, Canton. 

Pleasant Hill — B. F. Hill, W. F. Compton, J. L. Morgan, J. M. 
Haynes, and I. F. Moore, Clyde. 
Ratcliff Cove — James Liner, Clyde. 
Waynesville — E. M. Lightfoot. 

HENUERSON COUNTY ASSOCIATION. 

Hendersonville — J. Williams. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN A.SSOCIATION. 

Boiling Springs — D. F. Putnam, Waco. 
Kings Mountain — A. M. Ross. 
New Bethel— C. S. Cashwell, Shelby. 
Poplar Springs — R. N. Hawkins, Sharon. 

/S^e^bi/— Sidney Hamrick, P. T. Webb. E. Y. Webb, G. M. Webb, 
R. L. Limrick, J. D. Brevard, H. D. Wilson. 

Zion—A. C. Irwin, Pearl; D. F. Putram. Shelby. 

LIBERTY ASSOCIATION. 

AhhotVs Creek — N. R. Teague. 

Holloway's — O. L. Stoner. 

Lexington — Henry Sheets, James Smith. 

Liberty — John R. Miller, Fair Grove. 

Orphanage — J. D. Newton, W. H. Rich, J. B. Boone, A. Johnson. 

Piny Grove — Charles M. Wall, Wallburg. 

Reed's X Roads — A. E. Myers, Reed's. 

LIBERTY AND DUCKTOWN ASSOCIATION. 

Ducktown, Tenn. — J. V. Rynor. 

Mine City — E. D. Cole, Mineral Bluff, Ga. 

Pleasant Hill — C. M. Deaner. Mars Hill. 



LIST OF MESSKNGERS. II 

MECKLENBURG AND CABARRUS ASSOCIATION. 

Concord, First Church — B. Lacy Hoge, F. P. Smith. 
Mooresville — J. L. Shinn. 

Tryon Street, Charlotte — A. C. Barron, J. A. Durham. 
Twelfth Street, Charlotte— L,. R. Pruitt. 

MONTGOMERY ASSOCIATION. 

Mount Gilead — Edgar Haywood. • 

Star—W. B. Owen. 
WadeviUe — W. H. Parker. 

MOUNT ZION ASSOCIATION. 

Antioch — J. W. Watson, Gath. 

Burlington — G. H. Church. 

Cane Creek — J. F. MacDuffie, Rock Spring. 

Cedar Fork — I. S. Barbee, Nelson. 

Chapel Hill — Thomas Hume, F. L. Cleaveland. 

Durham, First Church — W. C. Tyree. 

Durham. Second Church — C. J. D. Parker. 

East Du7-harn — W. F. Fry, J. F. Pleasants. ; 

Graham — John C. Hocutt. 

West Durham — W. A. Smith. 

NEUSE ASSOCIATION. 

Kinston — C. W. Blanchard, J. B. Jackson, J. F. Parrott. 

NEW FOUND ASSOCIATION. 

Hot Springs — B. H. Mathews. 

North Fork of Big Pine—G. W. Wilde, J. R. Wilde. Big Pine. 

Zion Hill — R. C. Morgan, New Found. 

PEE DEE ASSOCIATION. 

Maxton — W. M. Jones, Wadesboro. 

Rockingham — Charles L. Greaves, William J. Fulford. 

PIEDMONT ASSOCIATION. 

High Point — J. B. Richardson. 
Pine Grove — J. W. Hines, Wallburg. 
Ramseur — Thomas Carrick, High Point. 
Reidsville — James A. Mundy, F. H. Jones, T. F. Scoggins. 
Salem Street. High Point — J. M. Hilliard. 

West Washington Street. Greensboro — R. W. Brooks, Livingston 
Johnson, Joseph Fred Watson. 

PILOT MOUNTAIN ASSOCIATION. 

Leaksville — R. E. White. 

Winston. Broad Street— G. V. Tilley. 

Winston.First Church — H. A. Brown. 



12 LIST OF MESSENGERS. 

KALSIGH ASSOCIATION. 

Cary — John E. White. 

inwood — O. L. Stringfield. 

^alem — J. M. White. Apex. 

Shady Grove — A. D. Hunter, Cary. 

STTkithfieU— 3 o^n W. Suttle, T. J. Lassiter, T. H. Brooks; W. H. 
Davis, Troy. 

Tabernacle, Raleigh — A. M. Simms. N. B. Broughton, T. B. Moseley, 
B. W. Spilman. 

Wakefield — A. A. Pippin. 

ROI5KSOX ASSOCIATION. 

Lumber Bridge — J. W. Cobb. 
Lumberton — George J. Dowell. 
Red Springs — J. D. Moore. 

S.ANUY CKEEK ASSOCIATION. 

Brush Creek — 0. T. Edwards, Mt. "Vernon Springs. 

SAM)Y lU .\ ASSOCIATION. 

Henrietta — -T. E. Herring. 

.SOUTH I'OUK AS.SOCIATION. 

Catawba — J. S. Bridges. 

Gastonia — W. F. Watson, H. B. Moore. 

Hickory— W. R. Gwaltney. J. F. Click. 

Lincolnton — D. P. Bridges, J. L. Wilkie. 

Macedonia — C. R. Orrender. Winston. 

Maiden — J. A. Hoyle. 

Newton — J. L. Vipperman. 

Penelope — C. M. Murchison. 

Salem — C. H. Payseur, Mars Hill. 

SOT'TH RIVKK .ASSOCIATION. 

Fayetteville — John A. Gates, .Ir. 
Salem — Samuel A. Howard. Salemburg. 

.SOITH YADKTX ASSOCI.\TION. 

Advance — E. Frost, Cana. 

Mocksville — S. D. Swaim. 

Salisbury — M. E. Parrish, Charles B. Jordan. 

Society — J. B. Holman, Cool Spring. 

Statesville — Edwin S. Reaves, John C. Turner, Charles A. Leonard. 

STANLY ASSOCIATION. 

Albemarle — J. A. McKaughan, Filmore Whitley. 
Palnierville — J. F. Davis. H. Morris. Z. D. Coggin. 



LIST OF MKSSKNGERS. 1 3 

TAK KIVKU ASSOCIATION. 

Rear Swamp — W. E. Bowers, hi iukleyville. 
Ephesus — G. W. uoppedge, Wakefield. 
Henderson — .1. D. Hufham. 
Louisburg — Forrest Smith. Josiah Crudup. 
Mount Vernon — George M. Duke, Euke's. 
'ocky Mount — M. L. Kesler. 
Scotland Neck — R. T. Vann. 
Tarhoro — Braxton Craig. 
WUson—\N. H. Reddish, D. Worthi gtor. 

TKNNESSEE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 

Bryson City — Jonathan Wood. 

Maple Spring — J. S. Woodard, Needmore. 

TRANSYLVANIA ASSOCIATION. 

tJnon — H. C. Osborne, Calhoun. 
Little River — A. J. Corn, Grange. 
Mount Moriah — F. M. Jordan, East Fork. 

TUCKASEIGEE ASSOCIATION. 

Cowee — T. C. Bryson, West's Mills. 

Gold Spring — H. H. Hyde, Bryson City, J. S. Smiley, Swain. 

Dillsboro — R. F. Jarrett, A. B. Smith. 

Franklin — J. R. Pendergrass, A. H. Sims. 

Oak Grove — W. L. Bradley, Etna. 

Pensecola — J. W. Kesterson, Sylva. 

Swain — E. Allison. 

Sylva — A. B. Thomas. 

Webster — H. C. Cowan, L. D. Cowan. 

UNION ASSOCIATION. 

Hopewell — A. C. Davis, Olive Branch. 
Meadow Branch — J. K. Bivens, Monroe. 
Mount Harmony — A. B. Caudle, Wingate. 

WEST CHOW^AN ASSOCIATION. 

Aulander — E. J. Harrell, A. W. Early. 
Murfreesboro — C. W. Scarborough, G. P. Harrill. 
Republican — T. T. Speight, Lewiston. 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION. 

Hayesville — M. A. Love, Mars riill. 
Martin's Creek — C. F. Martin, Ballew. 
Murphy — T. Bright. 



14 LIST OF MESSENGERS. 

YADKIN ASSOCIATION. 

Boonville — S. J. Beeker. 

Cross Roads — C. L. Bagby, M. J. Hendricks. 

YANCEY COUNTY ASSOCIATION. 

Burnsville — R. M. Farthing. 

Mount Pleasant — W. H. Sparks, Bald Creek. 



LIST OF VISITORS. 

R. J. Willingham, Richmond, Va. ; T. H. Plemmons, Abbeville, 
S. C; Robert G. Seymour, Philadelpbia, Pa.; E. E. Chivers, Chicago; 
W. E. Gwatkin, Louisville, Ky. ; A. E. Dickenson, Richmond, Va.; 
George A. Long, Asheville, N. C; M. D. Jeffries, Knoxville, Tenn.; 
J. M. Frost, Nashville, Tenn. ; F. H. Kerfoot, Atlanta, Ga. ; E. Y. Mul- 
lins, Louisville, Ky. ; J. L;. Blasingame, Raleigh, N. C. 



MINUT£( 



North Carolina Baptist State ConverLtioa. 



SIXTY=N1XTH ANNUAL SESSION. 



AsHEviLLE, N. C, Decemler 6, 1899. 

The North Carolina Baptist State Convention met in its 
Sixty-ninth Annual Session with the First Baptist Church of 
Asheville, IS". C, at 10 o'clock, Tuesday morning, December 
6, 1899. 

President R. H. Marsh called the Convention to order, 
devotional exercises having been conducted by F. L. Cleve- 
land, of Chapel Hill. 

The following were appointed a Committee on Enroll- 
ment: M. L. Kesler, B. W. Spilman, J. W. Bailey, J. A. 
Stradley, and A. M. Simms. The committee immediately 
performed its work and reported 166 messengers present at 
this hour. 

On motion of R. T. Vann, the Secretary cast the unani- 
mous vote of the Convention for R. H. Marsh, of Oxford, 
for President of the Convention. 

On motion of J. W. Bailey, N. B. Broughton was elected 
Secretary and Hight C. Moore, Assistant Secretary. 

The following were appointed a committee to nominato 
the remaining officers of the body : J. W. Bailey, W. F. 
Watson, John E. Ray, J. M. White, and C. J. Hunter. 

Visiting brethren were recognized as follows: R. J. 
Willingham, Corresponding Secretary of the Foreign Mis- 
sion Board, Richmond ; R. G. Seymour, Bible Secretary of 
the American Baptist Publication Society, Philadelphia; 



l6 MINUTES OF THE 

T. M. Plemiiions, of Soath Carolina; E. Y. Mulliiis, Presi- 
dent of the S(nuhei-ii Baptist Theological Seminary, Louis- 
ville; Georgell. Long, of the Methodist Church, Asheville; 
A. E. Dickenson, editor of the Religious Herald^ Rich- 
mond : M. D. Jeffries, of Knoxville, Tenn. ; J. E. Gwatkin, 
representing the Baptist Argus, of Louisville; J. W. Perry, 
of South Carolina; W. W. Jones, Troy, S. C. 

The Committee on Order of Business was appointed as 
follows: M. L. Kesler, J. E. White, C. J. Hunter, T. 
Bright, W. M. Jones. 

J. L. Lake, Professor of Physics in Wake Forest College, 
and A. H. Harnley. pastor i){ the Tabernacle, New Bern, 
were introduced to the Convention. 

On motion, E. Allison, of Brevard, and G. S. Jones, of 
Henderson ville, having been life members of the Western 
North Carolina Baptist Convention, were made life mem- 
bers of this body. 

On motion of R. T. Yann, ministers of all denominations 
were invited to seats in the Convention. 

J. W. Bailey, for the committee to nominate remaining 
oflBcers, reported as follows : Vice-Presidents, J. H. Tucker, 
Lycurgus Hofier, W. N. Jones; Treasurer, J. D. Boushall ; 
Assistant Treasurer, J. M. Stoner; Auditor, Walters Dur- 
ham; Corresponding Secretary, ,John E. White; Trustees, 
W. C. Tyree, C. M. Cooke, Livingston Johnson, T. H. 
Briggs, L. R. Mills. 

On motion of L. Johnson, the Convention adjourned to 
meet at 7.30 this evenintf. 



FIRST DAY^— Evening Session. 

Asheville, N. C, Decemher 6', IS99. 
The opening service of song was conducted by E. M. 
Lightfoot, of Waynesville. 
The Introductory Sermon was then preached by R. T. 



BAPTIST STATK CONVENTION. 1 7 

Van 11. of Scotland Neck. Text: Exodus xiii.l9. — '"And Moses 
took the bf)nes of Joseph- with hini ; for he had straitly 
sworn the children of Israel, saying, God will surely visit 
you ; and ye shall carry up ray bones away hence with you." 

The Convention was welcomed by W. M. Vines, on the 
part of the First Baptist Church, and by J. H. Tucker in 
behalf of the city of Asheville and the Baptists of Western 
North Carolina. Response on the part of the Convention 
was made by Livingston Johnson, of Greensboro. 

M. L. Kesler, for the committee, made the following: 
report, which was adopted : 

Thursday.— 9. 8lt a. m.— Devotional Exercises. 

10 a. m. — American Baptist Publication Societj'. 

10.30 a. m.— Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

11.30 a. m. — Foreign Missions and Reporc on Woman's Work. 

1.30 p. m. — Adjournment. 

3 p. m. — Periodicals. 
3.30 p. m.— Wake Forest College. 
Adjournment. 

7.30 p. m. — S. S. Board of Southern Baptist Convention. 
8 p m. — Home Mis.sions. 
Adjournment. 

Friday. — 9.30 a. m. — Devotional Exercises. 

10 a. m. — Committee on Destitute Fields in the State. 

11 a. m.— Committee on Missions at Manufacturing Centers. 

12 m. — Committee on Education in W. N. C. and Genei'al Education. 
1 p m. — Sunday Schools. 

Adjournment. 

T.30 p. m. — Orphanage. 
8.30 p. ni. — Baptist Female Universit\'. 
Adjournment 

Saturday.— 9.30 a. m. — Devotional Exercises. 

10 a. m.— Ministerial Relief. 

10.30 a. m. — Historical Papers. 

11.30 a. m. — Obituaries. 

12 m.— Special Committees. 



I a MINUTES OF THE 

The President announced the following coiiiniitlees: 

Home Missions.— C. S. Blackwell. G. H. Church. J T. Betts, L. N. 
Chappell. A. B. Walker, J. L. Morgan. 

Orphanage. — W. A. Smith, C. B. Paul. J. L. Shinn. S. D. Ssvaim. 
J. A. White. W. C. Stradley. 

Female University. — O. L. Stringfield. W. R. Teague. R. A. Sentell. 
E. Allison, J. B. Carlyle. A. H. Harnley. 

Obituaries.— ¥ . H. Jones. J. M. White. H. A. Brown. W. R. Gwalt- 
ney, J. D. Hufham. E. Allison. 

State Missions.— J. L. Wilkie. D. P. Bridges. E. A. Myers. J. A. Hoyle, 
R. O. Pernell. E. M. Lightfoot. 

Foreign Missions. — Thomas Hume. J. D. Brevard, C. L. Bagby. J. S. 
Bridges. R S. White. W. H. Reddish. 

Periodicals.— 3 . A. Mundy. J. E. Ray. R. H. Herring, T. C. King, 
S. D. Swaim, J. F. Vines. 

To Nominate Board of E'dwcahon..— Thomas Carrick, A. C. Payne. 
H. Morris, John R. Miller, Z. D. Coggins, B. H. Mathews. 

To Nominate Ministerial Relief Board. — B. F. Hester. A. A. Butler. 
J. S. Barbee, O. T. Edwards, J. B. Jackson, A. H. Sims. 

To Nominate Board of Missions and Sunday Schools. — Henry Sheets, 
J. R. Jackson. W. J. Hendricks. R. D. Carroll, J. B. Pruitt. W. H. 
Sparks. 

To Nominate Committee of Fifteen as Sunday School and Colportage 
Committee.-W. H. Rich. H. Morris. F. Whitley. J. C. Sorrels. C. F. 
Martin. 

Sunday Schools and Colportage. — J. D. Moore. T. B. Moseley, J. F. 
Parrott, G. N. Cowan. M. A. Love. 

Religious Exercises. — Pastors and Deacons of the Baptist churches in 
Asheville. 

To Nominate Preachers and Place of Next Meeting. — W. N. Jones, 
G. H. Church. J. A. White. B. W. Spilman, C. H. Durham. 

Finance. — L. Holier, C. J. D. Parker. J. P. Howatt. James Liner. 

Woman's Work.—F. L. Cleaveland. A. W. Early. G. M. Duke. A. B. 
Smith, T. C. Bryson. 

Education, Ministerial and General. — J. C. Blasiugame, E. J. Harrell. 
W. B. Waff. J. L. Lake. R. L. Moore, T. E. Skinner, 

Cooperation. — A. M. Simms. G. J. Dowell, J. J. Douglass, A. H. Por- 
ter. T. B. Justice. 

Ministerial Relief. — J. S. Hardaway, W. F. Watson, J. L. Vippermau, 
S. J. Beeker. R. S. White, S. J. Porter. 

John E. White, Corresponding Secretary of the Conven- 
tion, presented the Report of the Board of Missions and 
Sunday Schools, as follows: 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 1 9 

BOARD OF MISSIONS AND SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

It is with a deep sense of gratitude to God for His blessings upon 
our cause and His guidance in the management of our work, that the 
Board of Mi: sions and Sunday Schools presents its sixty-ninth 
annual report to the Convention. We greet you under circumstances 
of peculiar significance. 

Fortunate in the place of your meeting, a distinguished and 
attractive city, set in the hills of a country famed throughout the 
world, the home of a sturdy Baptist multitude and a hospitable 
people. 

Fortunate are we especially because of the peculiar significance of 
a meeting which celebrates the union of all sections of our State in 
one Convention. It is not the least of the benefits to be derived frona 
this union that those who attend this session of the Convention will 
learn the lesson which will be Impressed upon all who mingle here 
that Baptists do not draw their character from the soil or section in 
which they live, but from the truth in which they believe. The 
union of the two Conventions is not the mixture of diverse and dif- 
fering peoples, but of those who are and have ever been of "one Lord, 
one faith, one baptism." They come together as brethren who have 
a common history, a common faith and identical ideals. It will 
indeed make blessed our meeting here if we may all realize this 
truth; if as we part, looking west, the eastern Baptist may say to his 
western brother, "whither thou goest I will go, thy people shall be 
my people, and thy God my God," and looking east the western Bap- 
tist may linger at the parting with his eastern brother while both 
realize in their hearts 

" We are not divided, all one body we, 
One in hope and doctrine, one in Charity." 

The Convention from this exalted outlook may profitably look 
back 

JUST TWENTY YEARS AGO. 

Then only twenty-four Associations,nineteen of them represented in 
that session at Oxford,were cooperating in the work of the Conven- 
tion. Now every Association in the State,fifty-six in number, is coop- 
erating in our work. Then the Baptists of this State gave for Foreign 
Missions $2,875.70, ana there had gone out from them only two mis- 
sionaries to the heathen. Now we are giving $9,000, and since that 
time thirty-one have gone from the Baptist churches of North Car- 
olina to the Foreign fields, making in all from our churches to the 
heathen, thirty-seven. 



20 MINUTES OF THE 

Twenty years ago we were giving, including the Western Con- 
vention, $4,260.05 to State Missions. Now $20,000. 

Twenty years ago to Home Missions $1,196.38. Now $5,000. 

Twenty years ago tne Board of Education was aiding twelve young 
preachers; now thirty-seven. 

Then we had in the State Mission work eighteen missionaries: 
now one hundred. 

Then we had no Orphanage: now a home for our orphan children, 
liberally sustained and wisely managed. 

Then Wake Forest College was struggling for existence. Now it 
is thoroughly established in the hearts of our people, with a pat- 
ronage rapidly approaching three hundred, and an endowment and 
equipment of more than $250,000. 

Then the question of denominational duty in the education of our 
women had been discussed In only one corner of the State. Now 
the Baptist Female University, newly opened, challenges the admira- 
tion of all and eclipses the record of any State in the South in the 
Christian education of women. 

During the two decades, the Baptists of North Carolina have given 
to State Missions $240,316.00; to Foreign Missions $145,456.00; Home 
Missions $68,000.00: to the Orphanage $89,000.00; to Ministerial 
Education $62,000.00, and to all objects included in the schedule of 
church contributions more than five million dollars. 

THE year's work. 

The year just ended is easily notable as the best your Board has 
ever reported to the Convention in the following respects: 

We have had more missionaries, regular and voluntary, engaged 
directly in the work of preaching the gospel on State Mission fields. 
Their reports show greater activity in sermons preached, religious 
visits made in protracted meetings held, and money collected on 
the field. More Sunday Schools in operation, more otficers and 
teachers enlisted, more contributions from schools, more pupils 
enrolled in same and the number of baptisms is larger than last year 
by 200. 

We have raised $8,499.40 more for the objects of the Convention 
than last year. Thirty of our largest Associations have increased 
their pledges to State Missions 33 1-3 per cent over the pledges for 
the same cause last year, and our Treasurer's report will show that 
we have done $1,116.88 better for Home Missions, and $2,316.44 for 
Foreign Missions, and $4,553.16 for State Missions than last year — 
which was the best year in the history of the Convention in aggre- 
gate receipts for these causes. 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 21 

FINANCIAL CONDITION. 

It does not require the report of the Board to acquaint the Con- 
vention with the fact that the financial needs of the work have been 
urged with more than usual energy, and that no effort has been 
omitted to enlist the sympathy and liberality of our people for our 
State Mission worlc. Twenty thousand State Mission tracts have 
been distributed. The Corresponding Secretary has travelled more 
than thirty thousand miles, made two hundred addresses and ser- 
mons, and written 11,000 letters. 

The financial situation which the Board confronted January 1st, 
was as follows: A debt of $633.00 to the missionaries on the work 
of the year preceding; an overdraft of $1,061.07 which was reported 
to the Convention at Oxford. In addition to this, acting under the 
instructions of the Convention, the Board had appropriated for this 
year's work $5,000 more than in any year previous, making our total 
liabilities January 1st, including the obligations assumed by Asso- 
ciations for Associational Mission work, more than $20,000. It is 
to be noted that this enlargement was made after the meetings of 
the Associations last year, and was not therefore provided for in 
the pledges of the churches. Consequently, to meet these greatly 
increased obligations, an extraordinary effort was necessary. That 
effort lias been made. Nobly have our pastors, churches and people 
responded to it. During the last week the I'reasurer received more 
than $6,000.00. Our missionaries have been paid in full except 
$416.83 — vouchers outstanding due January 15th — the note due at 
bank December 1st has been paid — the overdraft of $1,069.07 of long 
standing is wiped out and with heart full of joy and praise to God 
for the fidelity, consecration and loyalty of our people we report to 
the Convention this glorious achievement. It must not, however, 
be forgotten that our new conventional year began November 1, 1898, 
and that at the end of the first quarter, February 1, 1900, we will 
need $5,000.00 to pay our obligations to the missionaries for that 
quarter. Let not this great deliverance, at a crucial period of our 
worl\ — for which we render thanks to God, and for which we rejoice 
together, be the cause of reaction, and discontinuance of earnest 
worlv for State Missions. 

Perhaps the most noteworthy feature of the financial condition 
of the work is the encouraging fact that the churches at the recent 
Associations have increased their pledges to State Missions for the 
coming year 33 1-3 per cent, and are now working on a $20,000 basis. 

OUR MISSION. \RIES AND THEIR WORK. 

The Board presents, herewith, a full and complete record of all 
its appropriations from State Mission funds during the year. This 



22 MINUTES OF THE 

does not include the amounts appropriated by the Executive Com- 
mittees of the Associations. 

Atlantic Association: 

M. P. Davis, by Board $115.00 

W. L. Bilbro 200.00 

R. D. Carroll 250.00 

W. H. Dodd 300.00 

J. M. Alderman 175.00 

C. B. Paul 100.00 

J. W. Rose 150.00 

H. H. Mashburn 200.00 

Joseph Ayden 200.00 

Beulah Association : 

Ephesus Church 50.00 

Buncomhe Association: 

T. C. King 75.00 

W. P. Sothern 75.00 

Caldwell Association: 

J. G. PuUiam 250.00 

Cape Fear and Columbus Association ■ 

J. T. Betts 200.00 

J. J. Adams and E. N. Pierce 100.00 

Central Association : 

M. R. Pernell 25. 0» 

Chowan Association: 

W. R. Carawan 175.06 

J. E. M. Davenport 75.00 

R. R. Overby 17-0.00 

Eastern Association: 

J. H. Hildreth • 75.00 

P. H. Farrington 225.00 

B. Ward 50.00 

N. A. Shelby 200.00 

Green River Association: 

J. C. Sorrells 300.00 

C. D. Graves 25.00 

R. L. Patton 100.09 

Kings Mountain Association: 

R. N. Hawkins 25.00 

G. M. Webb 25.00 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 23 

Liberty Association: 

W. H. Rich *l<>f). (to 

Liberty and Ducktown Association: 

E. D. Cole 50.00 

Mecklenburg and Cabarrus Association: 

S. F. Conrad 125.00 

L. R. Pruett 300.00 

J. L. Shinn 100.00 

B. Lacy Hoge 350.00 

D. W. Austin 25.00 

Montgomery Association: 

W. L. Wright 100.00 

Mt. Zion Association: 

F. L. Cleveland 150.00 

Pee Dee Association: 

C. L. Greaves 150.00 

Piedmont Association: 

J. A. Summy 25.00 

J. C. Hocutt 40.00 

J. M. Hilliard 250.00 

F. H. Jones 50.00 

E. P. Ellington 50.00 

Thomas Carrick 75.00 

Pilot Mountain Association: 

G. V. Tilley 200.00 

C. C. Haymore 40.00 

Henry Sheets 25.00 

Raleigh Association: 

J. W. Suttle 300.00 

A. A. Pippin 50.00 

A. L. Betts 100.00 

T. H. Leavett 100.00 

D. McLeod 125.00 

J. W. Smith 100.00 

Smndy Creek Association: 

J. M. White 25.00 

South Fork Association: 

W. R. Gwaltney 90.00 

J. L. Vipperman 90.00 

A. M. Ross . • • 50.00 



24 MINUTES OF THE 

South Yadkin Association: 

J. N. Stallings S=-iOO.O(i 

J. L. Shinn 200.00 

C. G. Wells 250.00 

Stanly Association : 

J. A. McKaughan 250.00 

Stone Mountain Association: 

Grant Cothern 50.00 

D. J. Roberts 50.00 

Tar River Association: 

B. K. Mason 75 00 

J. N. Booth 200.00 

B. Craige 225.00 

R. H. Herring 50.00 

G. L. Merrell 150.00 

M. L. Kesler 100.00 

J. W. Powell . 100.00 

R. G. Kendrick 100.00 

R. H. Gilbert 100.00 

W. A. Avers 50.00 

A. Cree 25.00 

Tuckaseigee Association : 

A. B. Smith 250.00 

Western North Carolina Association: 

T. Bright 400.00 

Carolina Association: 

T. B. Justice 100.00 

Cooperation: 

.1. A. Whitted. General Missionary 233.33 

P. F. Maloy, District Missionary 133.33 

.\. B. Vincent, District Missionary 133.33 

C. C. Sommerville, District Missionary 133.33 

General Missionary Western N. C, A. E. Brown, salary .... 800.00 
District Missionary Madison, Yancey, Mitchell counties, 

T. M. Honeycutt, salary 300,00 

Field Secretary, S. S. Dept., B. W. Spilman, salary 900.00 

Cor. Sec. John E. White, salary 830.00 

Treasurer, J. D. Boushall, salary 75.00 

Stenographer. Miss L. W. Partin. salary fi? ."i > 

Mission rooms, rents and incidentals 134.83 

Postage, stationery, etc 129.77 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 25 

N. B. Broughton and H. C. Moore, Secretaries jjlO.OO 

Printing minutes of Convention 20.00 

Expenses Volunteer Mission Corps 27;:i.(ivt 

STATISTICS OF WORK. 

The following, which has been gathered from quarterly reports 
of missionaries, will give a partial idea of what they have accom- 
plished during the year just ended: 

Number of sermons preached 7,028 

Churches supplied 262 

Out-stations supplied 112 

Persons and families religiously visited 13,220 

Persons baptized 16,030 

Number added by letter 920 

Protracted meetings held 288 

Professed conversions 2,235 

Houses of worship building 78 

Houses of worship finished this year 31 

Assisted in the organization of churches 33 

Number of Bibles and Testaments distributed 460 

Money collected for support of pastor on field $26,400.00 

For building or repairing house of worship 7,250.00 

Value of church property on fields 139,000.00 

For State Missions 1,396.80 

For Associational Missions 389.00 

For Foreign Missions 528.00 

For Home Missions of the S. B. o 482.26 

For ministerial education 220.60 

For Baptist Orphanage S06.83 

For Sunday Schools and colportage 154.22 . 

For other objects 4.693.00 

Report of Sunday School work of missionaries for the year is as 
follows : 

Number of Sunday Schools on fields 306 

Number of pupils enrolled in same 14,625 

Number of officers and teachers 1,890 

Number of conversions from these schools 486 

Members of church at work in Sunday Schools 2,560 

New schools organized this year 84 

Schools visited 220 

Contributions for scnool expenses $2,235.85 

Contributions for State Missions 79.40 

Contributions for other objects 273.26 



26 MINUTES OF THE 

THE WORK OF THE BOARD ENLARGINci. 

The growth of our State Mission field has been constant and 
natural. The successful occupacion of mission points has revealed 
opportunity in adjacent territories, and as we have increased the 
number of our missionaries we have discovered destitution before 
unknown. We believe it is true that no other denomination has 
surveyed and staked off the religious destitution of North Carolina 
as have the Baptists. Our field of work as it appears to-day before 
the Board naturally shapes itself into three divisions — destitution 
in Eastern North Carolina; the factory problem, and education in 
Western North Carolina. The work in each presents essential 
points of difference and requires different methods. In Eastern 
North Carolina we have large areas of genuine gospel destitution. 
In the Tar River Association the difficulties to be overcome are 
peculiar. The destitution to be supplied is that remaining from the 
intense bitterness of the great missionary controversy of 1834. The 
backbone of anti-missionism in the whole world is located there. 
There is not an anti-mission church in any other section of the State 
or of the world, which is not strengtened, encouraged and rendered 
more difficult of approach by the anti-mission stronghold in the Tar 
River Association. That spirit overcome there, its organic life in 
this State is ended. The distressing feature of the work is the 
fact that the descendants of those who constitute the anti-mission 
strength in the Tar River Association are growing up in practical 
infidelity; they are not joining even the anti-mission churches. If 
they are reached with the gospel at all, it will be at our hands. 

In the Atlantic and Neuse Association we have a different condi- 
tion. The great masses of the people are in a state of religious 
unrest. Every imaginable variety of belief flourishes there. The 
church organizations that exist are for most part nothing more than 
religious debating societies. It is very apparent, and indeed admit- 
ted by the people themselves, that out of this ferment the people 
need to be led. The disintegration that is going on affords to us 
a very rare opportunity. But our present force working in that 
field is manifestly inadequate. In thirteen counties in Eastern 
North Carolina we have only one Baptist preacher to the county. 

IN DUSTRI A L RE \0[^UTION . 

The Board submits to the Convention some important lacts which 
deserve serious attention with regard to the rapidly increasing 
factory population in our State. So remarkably has the number of 
factories multiplied that the condition is rapidly assuming the phase 
of industrial revolution. The faciory population has more than 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 27 

doubled itself dui'ing tiie past five years. An unfortunate feature of 
this movement for practical remedy is that there is an apparently 
unavoidable tendency on the part of this population to form a dis- 
tinct community which can be reached religiously only oy the pro- 
vision of a separate church and a separate pastor. At some points 
known to the Board this is not the case, but the exceptions to the 
rule are few. It is apparent, however, that the more factories estab- 
lished, and the larger the factory population, the more difficult it is 
going to be for our churches already established in a town or city to 
furnish adequate and suitable religious privileges. On every hand, 
in the secular press, in the trade journals, the indications point to a 
transformation of North Carolina into a manufacturing State within 
a few j^ears. The failure of agricultural pursuits to prove remuner- 
ative,the natural enticement of change and the gregarious instinct of 
the human family conspire to accelerate this transformation. It is 
now not a question of "will the people go?" but, "will the factories 
come?" The answer to this question is furnished by our undevel- 
oped water-power, our cotton fields, railway connection with ship- 
ping ports, and the abundance of anxious labor discouraged by 
unprofitable agriculture, which can be obtained much cheaper than 
in New England. 

The factories are already here, two hundred and fifty of them. 
Thirty new ones have been established this year, and the most con- 
servative and best-informed factory men express the opinion that in 
twenty years North Carolina factories will furnish employment to 
three hundred thousand operatives. 

Your attention is called to the fact, and it is here that Baptists 
are deeply involved, that the people who are to be and are already 
effected by this movement, are those connected directly or by attach- 
ment with Baptist churches. It is in the country that our numerical 
strength is to be found, and it is from the countrj^ that the people 
are movirg at the rate of five hundred a month during the year 1899. 
It is to be noted also that factories are being built for the most part 
at or near the towns and cities where Baptists are comparatively 
weaker and less influential than Pedobaptists. So that the prob- 
lem that presents itself to your Board is that of Baptist population 
moving into a Pedobaptist atmosphere where the influences are 
strong lo undermine doctrinal conviction, finally resulting, unless 
remedy is provided, in an absolute loss from our strength. The 
only practical plan of operation, as your Board sees it now, is for 
us to provide every such factory community not otherwise provided 
for with a preacher, a Sunday School and a church. At present we 
have only fourteen missionaries who are doing work among the 
factory people, of whom there are in North Carolina more than one 



28 MINUTES OF THE 

hundred thousand. This matter as a grave and serious question in 
our denominational progress should impress upon our churches the 
necessity for greater contribution and a larger support to State Mis- 
sions. 

EDUCATION. 

It has not been customary for your Board to include this depart- 
ment of work in its annual report to the Convention. But so inti- 
mately is education connected with missionary development that, in 
the absence of any agency of the Convention especially devoted to 
the consideration of this matter as it affects State Missions, we 
esteem it necessary that we should m this report bring to the atten- 
tion of the Convention at its present session a statement calling 
attention to it. 

The prevalence of illiteracy in North Carolina is a condition by 
which the devil always profits, and which hinders the advancement 
of the kingdom of God. This illiteracy is not confined to any one 
section of the State, and broadly speaking, it is a problem for every 
Association, for every local church. The missionaries of our Board 
have been urged to encourage by every means in their power the 
establishment of schools on the mission fields, and much of the 
progress we have made has been built up around school houses. In 
Western North Carolina especially, as elsewhere, the lack of educa- 
tional provision largely accounts for the absence of missionary 
development. Religiously, it s tne best evangelized territory in the 
world. Too much can not be said in praise of the aggressive evan- 
gelistic spirit which has brought this about. That the only remain- 
ing problem in Western North Carolina is an educational one pre- 
sents to this Convention a supreme duty and an imperative obligation. 
Without recounting the almost limitless possibilities of this section 
of our State commercially, it should be sufticient for us to know 
that the cause of Christ in the world and the happiness and great- 
est usefulness of our people, bone of our bone, and fiesh of our flesh, 
in this section will be marvellous conservea by Christian educa- 
tion. It is estimated that in twenty counties of Western North Car- 
olina there are three hundred thousand white people, of these one- 
third are children under the age of accountabil'ty. Of the popu- 
lation which has reached the age of accountability there are, accord- 
ing to the census of 1890, 125,000 professing Christians, or com- 
municants of all churches; and of these, according to the minutes of 
Associations covering this territory, 75,000 are members of Baptist 
churches. It is, therefore, a fact conceded by other denominations 
that Western North Carolina is a Baptist section. Obligation of any 
kind to benefit these people is a Baptist obligation. The waste of 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 29 

power by the undevelopment of intellect is a Baptist loss. The 
mountain boy potentially a Vance or a Clingman but for lack of 
education, is a Baptist boy. The mountain girl who becomes the 
mother of a sturdy family without that equipment so fortunate for 
humanity, is a Baptist woman. It should greatly emphasize our 
duty, as it should also quicken our diligence, that other denomina- 
tors are expending thousands of dollars in scnools in this section, 
and that there are five times as many Pedobaptist schools as there 
are schools even under Baptist control. Whoever educates the child 
will have the man. Whoever provides the school will furnish the 
church. Along with the spelling book there is going a catechism 
or that subtler influence from the hand that gives it which wins sym- 
pathy and following. Behind the catechism there is the preacher, 
and behind the preacher there will soon be a church. The head of 
one of these schools said to a representative of the Board, "The peo- 
ple are Baptists, we recognize that, but if you Baptist people are 
not able or willing to do this work, we must do it." It is a hopeful 
fact which your Board reports that our brethren in the Western coun- 
ties are not unmindful of the educational destitution, and are 
anxiously ready for cooperation in the effort to relieve it. In their 
Associations during the past summer the pastors and the brethren 
have discussed the situation, and there is common agreement that 
Baptists should educate Baptist children, and that they must do it or 
be recreant to an imperious necessitJ^ 

At the last session of the Convention a committee was appointed 
to confer with the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist 
Convention with reference to educational and mission work in 
Western North Carolina. The result of that conference held in 
Atlanta during the month of June was the approval by the Home 
Mission Board of a plan submitted and discussed before them for 
which they made the appropriation applied for. In outline this 
plan provides for the establishment and equipment of four schools 
of the same grade as Mars Hill College in Madison County. These 
schools are to be located at strategic points in the four natural divi- 
sions of Western North Carolina, to be selected in each instance by 
the Associations cooperating to establish it. To provide such rates 
of tuition as will place the schools within the reach of our people. 
To assist young men preparing themselves for the Baptist ministry 
and such as already in the ministry seeking educational advan- 
tages in obtaining academic instruction. To provide a professorship 
in each school of theology and Bible study suited to the needs of our 
preachers who will avail themselves of its benefits. To provide also 
for a series of pastors' institutes in each territory under the direc- 
tion of the above-mentioned teacher, assisted by members of the Vol- 



30 MINUTES OF THE 

unteer Mission Corps who are equipped for this kind of work. 
These institutes to be held during the summer months. One of these 
schools is already splendidlj' established at Mars Hill College, and 
is executing as iar as possible these plans during the current year. 
Another has been located by the Tuckaseigee, Tennessee River, Lib- 
erty a:id Ducktown and Western North Carolina Associations at 
Sylva, Jackson County, on property donated, together with a cash 
contribution of $500.00. Another at Fruitland, Henderson County, 
for the southwestern mountain section, which is already doing 
splendid work. The other school will probably be located in Wilkes 
County for the northwestern section of our mountain territory. It 
is evident that for the complete success of this carefully devised 
plan, we will need more money than has yet been provided. It will 
require not less than $1,000 a year for each school. The Board 
recommends that the Convention endorse the plan and encourage 
our people throughout the State to increase their contributions to 
State Missions so that the Board will be enabled to do its part in the 
complete establishment and adequate equipment of these schools. 

On February 19th, after consultation with our brethren in Western 
North Carolina, the Board elected Rev. A. E. Brown General Mis- 
sionary for Western North Carolina, at a salary of $800.00 and 
expenses. He entered the field on June 15th. The Board is grati- 
fied that the wisdom of the selection has been increasingly indicated 
by advices from every source, and feels it but just to say that 
Brother Brown has justified every expectation by his ability, energy 
and discretion in the performance of his work. We herewith place 
before the Convention his report. 

Report of A. E. Brown. General Missionary. 

1 entered upon the work of General Missionary for Western North 
Carolina in June of the present year. I have not spared myself in 
any hardsliip con.<equent to the duties of my office. I have traveled 
over 3,000 miles, mostly by private conveyance, and spoken to over 
25,000 people. I have confined my efforts mainly to the territory 
formerly occupied by the Western Convention. The work has consist- 
ed in visiting churches and attending Associations.laying before them 
the work of missions and the importance of education. I have vis- 
ited eighty-five churches and eleven Associations. My work has 
extended into eleven counties and the cnurches in Georgia and Ten- 
nessee which belong to our Convention. 

In this territory there are about 300 churches and 200 ordained 
ministers. The churches and pastors for the most part are well dis- 
posed toward the work of our Convention, wlien it is properly laid 
before them, but living as they do, remote from the markets, they 



BAPTIST STATp: CONVENTION. 3 1 

handle very little money. A goodly number of these churches wor- 
ship in public school houses and pay cheir pastors a very meager 
salary, if indeed it can be called a salary at all, consequently the 
pastors support their families by engaging in farming or other secu- 
lar employment, and preaching is a sort of side line with them. 
The pastors while uneducated are men of sterling worth and need 
help, and many of them would appreciate any effort to lift them 
to a higher plane of work. This can be done by Bible schools a'^d 
furnishing them with libraries to be paid for in monthly instal- 
ments. I am convinced that many of them would gladly take advan- 
tage of such opportunities should they be offered — indeed all of 
them to whom I have suggested such a plan have been eager to 
accept it. 

Feeling that education was the key to the situation which con- 
fronts us in this part of the State, I have bent my energies in that 
direction and the prospects are that within the next year three new 
schools of high grade will be opened. The Carolina Association has 
established their school at Fruitland, six miles east of Henderson- 
ville. They have in course of construction a handsome building 
which will cost $3,000 to finish and equip. It is well located and 
will have a large territory to draw from. They expect to have the 
first story ready for occupancy by the first of January. The school is 
already in operation with three teachers and more than 150 students. 

The Mitchell County Association has purchased, at a nominal sum, 
an unfinished school building in Bakersville, and expect to start a 
school early in the new year. 

Arrangements are being made to erect a large up-to-date school 
building at Sylva, in Jackson County, to be under the control of the 
Tuckaseigee and Tennessee River Associations. It will occupy, to 
my mind, one of the most important fields in the mountains. 

Two other schools are in contemplation — one in Burnsville, the 
other at some point m Cherokee County, not yet determined. 

I am hoping much from these schools. Ignorance is a foe to 
progress. Education broadens and gives a higher view of life and 
that is what we need. 

The points in this territory which are aiaed by the Board are 
doing w^ell. Brother Bright has succeeded in raising the debt off the 
parsonage property in Murphy, and the prospects for Baptists in thi^ 
field are brightening. Bro. A. B. Smith has done an excellent year's 
work at Dillsboro and surrounding country. A new church has been 
established near that town as a result of his labors. The meeting 
house at Weaverville has been completed sufficiently to occupy. 
There being no pastor to look after that field since the removal of 
Rev. W. W. Jones to another State, Capt. J. H. Stradley has taken 



32 MINUTES OF THE 

the work of finistiirg the house upon himself, and having interested 
some friends, it bids air to be completed at an early date. There 
are other points in this section which should be strengthened — such 
as Robbinsville, the county town of Graham County; Hayesville, the 
county town of Clay County, and Sylva, which is to be the seat of 
one oi our schools. 

As 1 look back over my six months' experience on this field I am 
greatly encouraged. For two years disintegrating forces have been 
at work in our midst which had alienated some of our people and 
so lessened the contribution for Conventional Missions that last year 
they amounted to only $383.20. This year the contributions for the 
same purpose will be more than twice that amount, and the people 
are rapidly falling into line again. This is a most difficult field, 
the fact that it is filled with dormant churches makes it so. But 
still it is a hopeful field. It is largely Baptist, but whether it 
remains so depends upon wise and persistent effort. Strong efforts 
are being made to wrest it from our grasp. We may expect to 
spend more money in this work for a few years than it returns to 
our mission treasuries, but there is every indication that a new era 
of growth in consecration and cooperation is dawning in Western 
North Carolina. 

A. B. Beown, 
General Missionary. 

THE VOLUXTEKR MI;>SION C<;)RPS. 

The second year's work of the Volunteer Mission Corps has been 
in many respects more satisfactory than last year. Some things 
have been learned by experience, and while not all those who were 
given appointments have filled them, the results from the meeting 
held by those who dio go more than offsets the loss from their fail- 
ure. The list of volunteers was increased during the year to one 
hundred and twenty. Indeed it is practically true that not a single 
pastor to whom the letter of invitation was sent declined to volun- 
teer. Few features of our denominational history are more note- 
worthy than this, and no movement has had a greater moral effect 
upon our progress. In other States of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention the fire has spread. The following is a report in total of the 
work that has been done this year by the Volunteer Missionaries: 

Days of service, 493. 

Number of sermons, 696. 

Attendance upon meetings, 7,265. 

Number of enquirers, 451. 

Number of professed conversions, 393. 

Special collections for State Missions. $224.68. 

Travelling expenses, $273.69. 



BAPTIST STATp: CONVENTION. 33 

COOPERATION. 

Cooperation between the Colored Baptist State Convention and 
American Baptist Home Mission Society and the Home Mission 
Board agreed to for a new term by our Conventon last year, has 
gone on during the year just ended successfully. One General Mis- 
sionary and three District Missionaries are employed for all their 
time.holdirg "New Era" Institutes working with the churches.organ- 
izing them ard inciting colored Baptists to larger missionary under- 
takings. It is just that we should speak of the diligence of these 
men and their wisdom in dealing with the difficult and delicate 
questions which have arisen to hinder and discourage their work. 
The success achieved by the plan of cooperation during four years 
is remarkable. 

In 1895 the negro Baptists in our State reported to their Conven- 
tion only about $300.00 for all missionary and educational purposes. 
At the recent session in New Bern their Treasurer reported $4,500 for 
these objects. 

To indicate something of the value of the work of cooperation as 
well as to show the volume of work performed we submit below a 
resume of the past four years prepared at our solicitation by the 
General Missionary, Rev. J. A. Whitted: 

'Tn compliance with your request for data respecting the work of 
cooperation in North Carolina for the four years ending October 31, 
1899, allow me to say we have labored altogether 1,110 weeks. Dur- 
ing this time 237 institutes have been held in different sections of 
the State. Four hundred and eignty-one colored lecturers have 
aided in these meetings, 245 white. The aggregate attendance of 
ministers was 2.374. The aggregate attendance of congregations, 
130,000. Besides this 2,147 addresses on the work and on all practi- 
cal and religious subjects have been given by our missionaries; 
1,550 sermons; 1,133 churches visited; 126,423 miles travelled; 
$9,727.15 collected for the different objects of the Convention. 

"The institutes have been rightly called "New Era" Institutes, 
for they mark a n-w era in the coloreil Baptist ministry of our State. 
There was never such a demand for the proper books as we have 
now among our ministers, and a more efficient service is manifest 
everywhere. The people themselves instructed m the institutes are 
demanding not only efficient men for their pulpits, but men of moral 
and spiritual qualifications. 

"A wonderful change is seen in our church meetings, in our Asso- 
ciations and in our Conventions. "Wrangling and disagreement have 
given way to the pleasant and profitable employment of devising 



34 MINUTES OF THE 

plans and proper methods of enlargement and development of Chris- 
tian work. 

"New activity and life are seen in every organization connected 
with the Baptists of the State. Their Foi-eign Mission work has 
so improved that the State now takes the lead in contributions. 
Their educational work was never so assuring as at this time. An 
assistant professor will be paid out of its educational fund, a num- 
ber of young men assisted in the study of the ministry and a num- 
ber of our young women assisted in the pursuit of an education. 

"The past year has been given largely to systematizing our work 
and the results have been far oeyond our expecation. 

"Our receipts in the past four years as compared to the previous 
years has been ten to one. Cooperation has simply brought about 
revolution in our State. We can not speak so positively about the 
good it has brought to the white people, and yet we know they have 
been benefitted to some extent. Their gifts of money, time and 
talent in helping us to carry on the work have brought to them bless- 
ings untold. This is buu the fulfillment of our Saviour's teachings 
when He said, 'It is more blessed to give than to receive.' 

"The work has brought the races more in touch with each other, 
and we have every reason to thank God for this act of His providence 
in bringing to our State its greatest blessing." 

SU.NDAY SCHOOI-S. 

The committee of fifteen from the Board of Missions and Sunday 
Schools to which the Convention commits the Sunday School work 
in North Carolina, Colportage and the Baptist Book Store, submit 
through the Board to the Convention the following report: 

Your committee presents herewith a report of the work done in the 
field of Sunday School work, through the statement of Rev. B. W. 
Spilman, Field Secretary of the Sunday School Department: 

SUNDAY SCHOOL KEPORT. 1899, BY B. W. SPILMAX. 

The year just closing has been the best for the Sunday School work 
in the history of the new movement for helping Sunday School work- 
ers, started in Greensboro in 1895. I submit my fourth annual 
report. 

The worii of creating an interest in Sunday School work has been 
pushed along the usual lines. At many points in the State Sunday 
School Rallies have been held. I have attended eighteen of these. 
Sunday School Institutes were held during the spring and summer 
months. Engagements for five Sunday School Institutes had to be 
cancelled on account of the snow in February and of the prevalence 
of smallpox in the State later in the winter. 

There was instituted during the year the plan of securing men 
familiar with Sunday School work to hold Sunday School Institutes. 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 35 

The Sunday School Committee made an appropriation of fifty dol- 
lars for this work. Under this plan Bro. J. M. Broughton, of 
Raleigh, John E. Ray, of Raleigh, and Prof. C. C. Crittenden, of 
Wilson, were secured for work in Sunday School Institutes. 

Two District Chautauquas were held during the year. The Eastern 
Chautauqua met at Scotland Neck in July, and was well attended. 
The musical feature was especially prominent. The Mountain Chau- 
tauqua held its second session in Mars Hill, Madison County, and was 
in every way a success. People were registered in attendance from 
six different States and from twenty different counties. A large 
tabernacle is to be buiit, and everything points to the building up of 
a great summer gathering for the study of the Bible and methods of 
Sunday School work. 

During November a school for Bible study was conducted for a 
week at Buie's Creek, in Harnett County. The school was conducted 
on the school plan, two topics being discussed each day and 
studied during the interval. The attendance and interest mani- 
fested far exceeded my expectation. 

The State Sunday School Chautauqua met in its seventh annual 
session in Shelby in July. It drew Sunday School workers from 
everj' section of the State, manj' attending from the mountains 
and from as far east as Elizabeth City and Morehead City. The 
course of normal lessons by Dr. C. R. Blackall, of Philadelphia, was 
the special feature. 

In connection with the summer school at Wake Forest there was 
held a Sunday School Institute. Bro. N. B. Broughton directed the 
meeting. 

The Baptist Female University has provided for a course of lec- 
tures on Sunday Schools. 

It had been planned that I should attend fifteen of the Associa- 
tions in the interest of Missions. A slight attack of malarial fever 
prevented my attending eight of them. I attended seven. A sum- 
mary of the meetings attended is as follows: 

State Chautauqua 1 

Summer School, Wake p orest 1 

Bible School, Buie's Creek 1 

District Chautauquas 2 

Associations 7 

S. S. Rallies 18 

S. S. Institutes 38 

68 

In addition to the above meetings addresses were delivered in 
various sections of the State, the work having been in 41 counties 
and 35 Associations, including in all 352 sermons and addresses. 



36 MINUTES OF THE 

During the year departments for Sunday School workers have 
been conducted in the Biblical Recorder by Pastor H. C. Moore, New 
Bern; in the NortJi Carolina Baptist by Prof. W. R. Cullom, of 
Wake Forest College, and in Charity and Cliildren by myself. 

Something has been done toward providing a correspondence 
course for Sunday bchool workers. It is hoped to offer it to the 
Sunday Schools of the State during the early weeks of 1900. 

December bO, 1898, the Sunday School Committee ordered that 
"B. W. Spilman is chargeu with the duty of organizing an increased 
interest in the colportage work by inducing churches and associa- 
tions to appoint colporters, and the Baptist Book Store be instructed 
to offer the best possible inducements to promote the colportage 
work." I have on hand letters from every section of the St^te urg- 
ing the necessity for colportage work. Something has been done — 
at best very little. Beyond the work of about a third of the State 
Missionaries who sold a few books as opportunity offered, and six or 
eight Associational and Volunteer Colporters practically nothing has 
been done in this line. The need is urgent, but how to supply it is 
a problem not yet solved. The matter will gradually be brought to 
the attention of the Associations, and it is hoped that something may 
be done. 

June was selected by the Sunday School Committee as Sunday 
School month, and an appeal was sent out to the Sunday Schools of 
the State for a contribution for the Sunday School work. 

In response to this appeal about $250 has been received. This 
does not represent the amount of contribution by the Sunday Schools 
for this object. It was in several instances noted that in a reply 

to the appeal would be, "Our Sunday School at A will take 

collection in June for Sunday Schools. We will raise $.5.00." Then 
in the latter part of June or first of July an acknowledgment appears 
in the Recorder, "State Missions, Sunday School A $5.00." 

Below I submit financial statement: 

Salury. 

For November, 1898 ijSG.OO 

December 1. 1898 to December 1. 1899 875.00 

Total salary for 13 months $925.00 

Expenses. 

To volunteers iioldino: Institutes 10.65 

Expenses to Mars Hill Chautauqua 1 6 . 00 

Attending Associations 21.45 

Postao;e. stationery, fixt ure.s 42 . 7 1 

Traveling expenses. _ 77.47 

168.28 

1.093.28 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 37 

Coi, PORTAGE. 

The best system of colportage work is that which makes every 
Baptist not only a reader of good literature, but the active unit in 
the propaganda of good literature. It is our plan to encourage this 
through the agency of the Baptist Book Store. Our efforts in this 
direction have been especially successful in cooperation with the 
missioraries of the Board. Kach missionary is urged to carry a 
stock of books, and is furnished with such as he thinks he can dis- 
pose of without any actual money outlay on his part,his account with 
the Store being charged to the Board of Missions. Forty of the mis- 
sioraries th:'s year have been enlisted in this plan, and have sold 
$873.70 worth of books, Bibles and Testaments, and have distributed 
tracts on missiorary and doctrinal subjects. We have also about 
ten colporters working under the direction and by the appointment 
of Associations. In addition to this should be mentioned the large 
number of pastors who keep a stock of books and other literature for 
distribution among their people. 

It should be evident to all that there has been no time in our 
history when the Baptists in North Carolina should be so watchful 
against pernicious literature and so active in offsetting the hurtful 
zeal of those who propagate error and ism, by a vigorous distri- 
bution of books, tracts and papers which maintain and defend the 
truth. Your committee has had many applications for cheap Bibles 
and Testaments for gratuitous distribution among the poor who 
were in want of such literature, and the indifferent who were in 
need of it. We have been compelled to answer these applications 
with the statement that we have no fund with which these could be 
supplied. Could the Board of Missions and Sunday Schools do bet- 
ter than to set aside $500.00 each year for colportage and Bible dis- 
tribution"' 

The Baptist Book Store. 

This department of the work continues to vindicate the wisdom 
which eigliteen years ago established the Baptist Book Store. Dur- 
ing the past year the Store has increased its bvLsiness SI 585.14 over 
last year. Upon reference to the Treasurer's books it will be seen 
that the Store has paid out of its profits on the appropriations made 
by the Boaril of Missions the suiii of §600. 

The need of capital is more and more realized as the Store seeks 
to serve our preachers and Sunday Schools in supplying books and 
literature. If the Convention can provide the Store with $1,000 
as working capital, the Store can engage to return to State Missions 
on the amount annually over and above its present contrihution. 



38 



MINUTES OF THE 



Below is submitted a statement which shows what the business has 
been during the year and the present linancial condition of the 
Store: 

Business of Baptist Book Store for Twelve Months, Showing Amount of 
Business and Profits on same by Months Since December 1, 1898. 



Month. 



Amount of 
Business. 



1898. 

December §1,465.10 

1899. 

January 71 1 . 98 

February 241. 99 

Marr-h 1,323.66 

April ; 755.39 

May I 467.82 

June [ 1 , 487 . 61 

July I 618.26 

August 658.25 

September .1 1,515.99 

October j 634. 46 

November 569.40 



Profits. 



§269.77 

139.65 

48.26 

221.91 

147.67 

92.46 

271.79 

121.98 

90.08 

279.80 

125.35 

112.85 



10,449.91 : 1,921.97 



ANNU.AX BALANCE SHEET OF THE BOOK STORE. 

November 30, ISDU. 



By merchandise 

By accounts _.. . ... .... 


S3, 115.39 

825.13 

3, 603. 53 


$3 
2 


144.71 
500.78 


Paid salaries account missionaries 

" donations and discounts 

" furniture and fixtures 

■' Baptist Almanac 


600. 00 
225. 13 
340.00 
100.00 


' ■ cash 


633.43 


Dr. 

To liabilities 

To donations . . 




To balance . . . . . 










7,544.05 


7 


544.05 


Bv balance . . 




3 


603.53 







Mission Rooms. 

The increased business of the Baptist Book Store, and the neces- 
sity for a larger and less public place for the meeting of the Board, 
has made it necessary for changes in the local home of the Board. 



BAPTIST STATE C0NV1':NTI0N. 



39 



The Book Store lias the room at the rear of the first floor of the 
building which was formei'ly occupied by the Board. And the 
Board's rooms are now in larger and better quarters on the second 
floor of the building. Most favorable terms were granted by Mrs. 
Annie S. Bailey, the owner of the property The Board and its 
officers can now transact its work much better than under the 
formerly crowded conditions. 

At some future time the Convention should consider the advisa- 
bility of buying and owning a building for Baptist headquarters in 
Raleigh. 

Home Missions. 

The. success of every interest to which Southern Baptists are com- 
mitted is in a measure dependent upon the efficiency and support 
given to our Home Mission Board. Its work is basal work, and is 
important not only in preparing the way and laying the founda- 
tions upon which the denomination may build, but also in fostering 
and developing weak and important interests in many of our South- 
ern States. It has been said that "Home Missions have always been 
the chief source of all other missionary and educational enterprises." 
Dr. A. J. Rowland has said: 

"If we are ever going to enlarge our missionary forces abroad, rein- 
force old flelds and occupy new ones, we must develop our resources 
at home. The truth is, the extension of the Foreign Mission work 
during the past quarter of a century is due in no small degree to the 
results of Home Mission operations. There are hundreds of 
churches all over our land which are now pouring their offerings 
into our Foreign Mission treasury which were founded and fostered 
by our Home Mission Boards. If enlargement is to go on in the for- 
eign work it must be by the same processes." 

The field of our Home Board embraces all the States south of and 
including Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, together with Okla- 
homa and Indian Territories, and the Island of Cuba. 

The work of the Board is largely cooperative and is naturally 
divided into the following general departments: Mountain Regions, 
Frontier WorR. Foreign Population, Work Among the Negroes, Work 
in Cities and Cuba. 

The name Sunday School Missionary was changed by the Sunday 
School Committee to Sunday School Field Secretary. 

MOUNTAIN REGIONS. 

Including West Virginia, the territory thus described embraces an 
area of two hundred thousand square miles. It comprises parts of 
the States of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Ten- 



40 minute;s of the 

nessee, Kentucky and Alabama. The last annual report of the 
Home Mission Board contains the following reference to the impor- 
tance of this department of its work: 

"The expressed desire of the Convention that the Board should do 
more for the mountain people, has not been accompanied by the 
necessary increase of funds that would enable the Board to execute 
in full its wishes in this matter. 

"Many of the reports of the Board bear witness to the fact that 
it has not failed to appreciate the importance of this field, or been 
dilatory in its efforts to supply its needs. 

"The Xew York News, one of our most prominent political jour- 
nals, says of this region, after describing a part of it which embraced 
about one hundred thousand square miles, that this small area pos- 
sesses greater natural resources than any tract of a million square 
miles to be found anywhere on the globe. 

"It is well knoM-n that the great majority of these mountaineers 
are Baptists. Their isolation has been the great barrier to their 
progress. They need more and better schools, more instructive 
preachers, everything that will give them a broader outlook, thus 
enabling them to appreciate the advantages of their condition and 
to utilize them, not only for their own good, but for that of the 
world at large." 

FRONTIER WORK. 

The time was when what are now Baptist strongholds in States 
east of the Mississippi River constituted what is known as frontier 
stations, and were helped by the Home Mission Board. The frontier 
line has gradually receded westward, until it may be described as 
beginning at the Kansas line and extending southward to the Rio 
Grande, thence along that river to the sea. It comprises an area of, 
approximately, a thousand miles in length by five hundred miles 
wide. It embraces the whole of Oklahoma and Indian Territories 
and portions of Arkansas and Texas. 

FOREIGN POPL'L.\TION. 

In our great cities are gathered the great body of the foreign 
population of our Southern (;ountry. In the country places the 
Board has done work in the interior towns in Missouri, in Oklahoma, 
in El Paso and the contiguous parts of Arizona, and, in cooperation 
with the State Board of Texas, in the central parts of that State, and 
in Austin, San Antonio and along the Mexican border. 

The principal work of the Board has been done in Baltimore, 
Louisville, St. Louis and Kansas City. 

This is a work, the importance of which is not appreciated by 



BAPTIST STATP: CONVENTION. 4 1 

our people. The thousands of foreigners coming to our country 
annually must be evangelized if they are to become useful citizens. 

IN THE CITIES. 

While the work of the Home Board has been very largely in the 
country, the growing towns and cities have not been neglected. It 
has been said: 

If you should select one hundred of the most important towns 
and cities in the Southern States, you would find on examination 
that churches in at least ninety of the hundred had been helped 
by the Home Mission Board. You would further find that in the cap- 
ital of every State within the bounds of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, with one solitary exception, churches in the day of their 
w^eakness have been helped by the Home Mission Board. Also in 
the capital of this nation churches of both races have in their begin- 
ning received financial aid from this same agency. 

WORK AMON(i THE NEGROES. 

The proper religious training and moral guidance of the Negro 
is a responsibility peculiarly committed to Southern Baptists. The 
work of the Board among the negroes is chiefly cooperative work 
under what is known as the Fortress Monroe plan. This work has 
proven eminently satisfactory in the development of Christian char- 
acter and improving the condition of the Negro. 

This character of cooperative work has been carried on in the 
States of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, 
South Carolina and Virginia. It is probable that the work will soon 
be taken up in Texas. 

CUBA. 

By agreement, there has been a division of territory in Cuba 
between the Baptist Home Mission Society of New York and the 
Home Board, it being agreed that the former shall occupy the two 
Eastern Provinces, and the latter shall confine its missionary labors 
to the four Western Jr'rovinces. This gives to Southern Baptists an 
opportunity of doing far more mission work in Cuba than contribu- 
tions enable the Home Board to carry on. The Board has its work 
well established in tnree Provinces. In Havana Province under the 
supervision of Dr. Diaz. In Matanzas Province, Rev. J. V. Cova is 
the General Missionary for that Province, while Rev. J. R. O'Hal- 
loran is in charge of the work in Santa Clara Province. The work 
is prospering at a number of points in these Provinces. There is a 
great demand for more preachers and teachers. 



42 MINUTES OF THE 

LAST year's work. 

The last annual report of the Home Mission Board stated: "The 
report of the Board for the year just closed is the best ever made to 
the Convention. 

"The number of missionaries employed this year was 653 against 
467 last year. Baptisms this year 6,552 against 4,739 last year. 
Total additions to churches this year 12,983 against 9,509 last year. 
Sunday Schools organized this year 512 with 14,768 teachers and 
pupils, against 297 with 7,710 teachers and pupils last j^ear." 

sixcE 1845. 

The Home Mission Board has sent out under annual appointment, 
since its organization, 7,270 missionaries who have reported 160,863 
additions to churches, and have constituted 2,789 churches. It has 
established about one-seventh of all the white churches within the 
Southern Baptist Convention. 

NORTH CAROLINA AND THE HOME BOARD. 

By the union of the Western North Carolina Convention with the 
North Carolina State Convention, our dependence on the Home Mis- 
sion Board has been increased. We are gratified to be able to report 
that in recognition of our increased responsibility the Home Board 
has promptly granted such increased appropriation as, in the judg- 
ment of our Board, it seemed proper to suggest for the current year. 

In addition to the amount of over $600 being expended by the 
Home Board in cooperative work among the negroes in North Car- 
olina, it is in cooperation with our State Board in our general edu- 
cational and mission work. It has appropriated for the present 
Southern Baptist Conventional year, and is paying into the treasury 
of our Board, for this purpose, the sum of $3,000. 

APPEAL. 

In the light of what this Board has accomplished in the past, of the 
important work in which it is now engaged, and of the great 
need for enlargement, we commend to the prayerful consideration 
and the active support of every Baptist in North Carolina, the appeal 
of the Home Mission Board for increased contributions. It has 
stated that to carry forward the work committed to it, with any 
proper degree of efficiency, it needs not less than one hundred thou- 
sand dollars in cash contributed by the churches. Of this amount 
North Carolina Baptists ought to give during the coming year $6,000. 
The growing interest and intelligence of our people in Home Mis- 
sions, which is in no small degree due to the active and able efforts 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 43 

of J. C. Caddell, North Carolina's Vice-President of this Board, indi- 
cates that we will reach this amount. 

Your Board in concluding report on Home Missions would in 
behalf of North Carolina Baptists extend to Dr. F. H. Kerfoot, the 
new Corresponding Secretai'y of itie Board, the heartiest greetings of 
sympathy and good-will. 

We will also express our love and honor for the retiring Sec- 
retary, Dr. I. T. Tichenor, who has been, in the judgment of your 
Board, during the past twenty years, as an individual, the greatest 
factor in the development of Southern Baptists, and whose coopera- 
tion and assistance is still a vital power in the successful manage- 
ment of our Home Mission work. 

Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. 

In submitting our report for the general work, we would leave it 
incomplete except mention were made of the Sunday School Board 
of the Southern Baptist Convention, with headquarters at Nashville, 
Tenn. This Board is coordinate with the Home and Foreign Boards, 
and stands as an agency of the Convention for the furtherance of 
its work along certain lines and in behalf of a great interest. 

As set out in this report, to the recent session of the Convention 
in Louisville, this Board had last year the most prosperous year in 
its history, and is becoming more and more a factor in our denomina- 
tional life, helping all the other great interests that are fostered by 
the Convention. 

Its benevolence during the last Convention year in appropriations 
of cash and books and tracts and Bibles and periodicals and mis- 
sionary boxes amounted to over twelve thousand dollars, and in eight 
years to nearly seventy-five thousand dollars, besides the enlarge- 
ment of its business in every department of work. 

This enterprise of the Southern Baptist Convention has developed 
into a great business under the absolute ownership and control of 
the Convention, and for the advancement of all the Convention's 
interests — a business which, measured by its income making power, 
is easily worth two hundred thousand dollars and has been built up 
without the investment of any money capital on the part of the 
denomination. 

The periodicals and publications of the Board are well adapted 
to meet the needs of our people, and especially directed to forward 
the interests which we as a denomination have in hand. 

(1) A full line of bunday School periodicals, with all that is 
needed for the equipment of a Sunday School. 

(2) A Convention Alamanac, published annually, edited by Dr. 
Lansing Burrows, full of facts and incidents in denominational life- 



44 MINUTES OF THE 

and also setting out all the work of the Convention, following in 
order the Mission Card prepared by the Woman's Missionary Union. 

(3) The Story of Yates the Missionary, written by Dr. Chas. E. 
Taylor, and setting out in a wonderful way the life-work of our 
great missionary to China. 

(4) A Great Trio, a paper-bound book consisting of three charm- 
ing lectures before the Seminary at Louisville, Dy Dr. W. R. L. 
Smith, having for his subjects Jeter, Fuller and Yates. 

(5) Restricted Communion, a tract of 70 pages, by J. M. Frost, 
and also a full line of catechisms by John A. Broadus, Basil Manly 
and others. 

All these periodicals and publications are issued by the Board for 
the Convention, being entirely under its control and ownership. 

The Bible Department of the Sunday School Board stands for the 
Bible work of the Southern Baptist Convention. Contributions to 
its Bible Fund entitles to representation in the sessions of the Con- 
vention. The Board last year sent out nearly twelve thousand 
copies of the Word of God into destitute places, making its appro- 
priations for the most part through the missionaries of the State 
Board and the Home Board. Bibles have been sent out on the 
Irontier, also for distribution among the immigrants in Baltimore, 
among Cuban refugees in Florida, also to Africa and to Cuba. No 
one can forecast the harvest which may come from this sowing of 
the Seed of Life. We commena this worK to the thoughtful consid- 
eration of our people, counting ii worthy of their support and con- 
tribution. 

The Board makes special effort for the training of the young in 
missionarj' thought and life through its Kind Words and mission 
articles in the Teacher, and other mission publications. In addi- 
tion to this, it has two special days in the Sunday Schools — namely, 
Missionary Day, the last Sunday in September, and Children's Day. 
the second Sunday in June. Programs are prepared and fur- 
nished without cost for these services, in whateA'er quantities may be 
needed and as the school may desire. The educational value of 
these services can hardly be overestimated. The money that is 
collected from Missionary Day, though s^nt directly to the Sunday 
School Board, is forwarded to the Home and Foreign Boards, being 
divided equally between these two Boards unless otherwise desig- 
nated. The money which comes from Children's Day in June goes 
to the credit of the Bible Fund, and for every dollar that is 
received the Board appropriates another dollar from its business, 
and so makes every contribution do double service in sending out 
Bibles and Testaments to destitute places. 

The great ultimate end of all this work of the Board is for the 



BAPTIST STATK CONVENTION. 45 

advancement and improvement of our Sunday School condition. 
Tliere are thousands of churches among us that have no Sunday 
School, and the Sunday Schools we have need advancement in 
many ways. The Home Department in the Sunday Scaool is 
intended to carry the Word of God into the family circie; and we 
need, both in the school and in the home, to emphasize afresh the 
Bible as the very Word of God. The boys of to-day are the men of 
to-morrow; and there is tremendous power in the printed page for 
the making of men. We need to enlarge the Sunday School thought 
and purpose. Here is a great mission field for missionary sowing 
and a missionary harvest. Here we lay the foundations for future 
usefulness. 

The Convention, in its Sunday School rJoard, is carrying forward 
the Sunday School cause and seeking in every way to foster the 
great interests for the furtherance of its work. The appeal of the 
Convention for this Board is not less urgent than its appeal for the 
Home and Foreign tioards. It is worth our while, in view of the 
great interests we have in hana, to carry the Sunday School Board 
into all our churches. There is hardly a more effective way in which 
to build up and strengthen and carry forward our work. 

Foreign Mih^sioNS. 

The highest and most unselfish and Christ-like form of Christian 
service and missionary effort is that wiiich looks to the evangeliza- 
tion of the entire race. No one can be a missionary in the true sense, 
in the sense in which our Master was and in which He desires us to 
be, without takirg upon His heai^t the bearing of the message to all 
people and the bringing of all people to Christ. The crown of our 
Baptist people in this fair State is that they have always sustained 
an earnest and sympathetic attitude toward this world-wide depart- 
ment of the Lord's work, giving to it not only of their money, but 
many of their best men and women. 

Rejoicing in the liberty wherewith Christ has made us free and 
believing in the helpfulness of fellowship and the strength of 
cooperation, we have always done our Foreign Mission work, in com- 
pany with our brethren ot other States, through the Foreign Mission 
Board, S. B. C. Hence, to discuss ojh- Foreign Mission work is to 
discuss that Board and its work. 

At the last session or the Convention, which was held last May 
in Louisville, the Board reported a fine year's work. During the 
fiscal year, ending April 30th, the Board had received from the 
benevolence of our people $108,716.06, which added to a gift or two 
from outside sources and to tne income from some invested funds, 
gave the Board an aggregate income of $109,267.43. This was sev- 



46 MINUTES OF THK 

eral thousand dollars less than the receipts of the year preceding. 
But this falling off was not unnatural under all the circumstances, 
and is not to be regarded as an indication that the interest of our 
people in the work was less than formerly. In this connection it 
is very gratifying to note that our State not only did not fall off but 
made an encouraging gain in its contributions, giving $8,092.91, as 
against $7,839.63 the year before. It is also gratifying that not- 
withstanding the falling off in the receipts, the Board conducted its 
business in such a way as to report no debt, with a small balance 
on hand. 

For our own fiscal year just closed our State has given SIO.640.34. 
which IS a gain of Sl.Soo.Oo over last year. For this we thank God 
and take courage. 

rhe last report of the Foreign Board to which we referred above, 
was exceedingly inspiring as to the work accomplished. During the 
year '98, the period covered by the statistical part of the report, there 
were 845 baptisms on the six fields now occupied. This is far the 
largest number ever reported. Tne report showed 100 churches, and 
140 out-stations, 82 missionaries, and 128 native helpers, a net gain 
of 712 members and a membership of 5,347. 

Having its spirit stirred by the thrilling facts of this splendid 
report, the Convention, by a rising unanimous vote, instructed the 
Board to plan the work this year on the basis of a 25 per cent 
increase. Under this instruction the Board has sent out ten new 
missionaries since tne Convention, and is planning for larger things. 
The latest advices that we have from Richmond bring us the good 
tidings that there is a general spirit of enlarged liberality among 
the churches, which has broughi the contributions up to date to a 
considerably higher point than they were at a similar date last year. 
And, what is much better news, that the Lord's blessings upon the 
field are exceeding abundant, one of the fields having baptized in the 
first nine months of '99 a larger number of converts than for the 
whole of '98, which, as already shown, was much the most blessed 
year up to date. 

In the face of such facts we are of the opinion that all our hearts 
ought to be stirred, and that our gifts ought to flow into the treasury 
with an ever increasing generosity. The Foreign Board requests us 
to give during its current fiscal year $9,000. We recommend that 
this Convention approve the request, and pledge ourselves heart and 
hand to raise the amount. 

While the Board has already sent out ten new missionaries since 
the Convention we learn from the Corresponding Secretary several 
other good men and women are needed for stations imperatively 
calling for reinforcement. 

We recommend that this Convention and our people throughout all 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 47 

our State pray that the Lord may honor and bless us by calling 
from among us some of our brightest and best to go. We pray 
that North Carolina may in the future as in the past give not only 
her money but her men, that the splendid line beginning with Yates 
may have an unbroken succession, that the stream of consecrated life 
going out from among us to refresh the foreign field may con- 
tinue with ever increasing volume, and that the spirit of world- 
wide missions among our people may be ever at flood tide. 

Report of the Woman's Central Committee. 

The following is the list of members of Central Committee, and 
Vice-Presidents of Associations for 1900, approved by the Board of 
Missions and Sunday scliools: 

Mrs. J. A. Briggs, Mrs. Egerton, Mrs. T. H. Briggs, Mrs. N. B. 
Broughton, Mrs. J. W. Carter, Miss Maude Reid, Mrs. W. N. Jones, 
Mrs. J. C. Ellington, Miss E. Briggs, Mrs. A. M. Simms, Miss Fannie 
E. S. Heck. 

vice-presidents. 

Atlantic — Mrs. Hight Moore, New Bern. 

Neuse — Miss E. A. Draughan, Kinston. 

Central — Mrs. William Royall, Wake Forest. 

Beulah — Mrs. L. N. Chappell, Milton. 

Chowan — Mrs. Fannie Whitehurst, Elizabeth City. 

Columbus and Cape Fear — Mrs. J. G. Blalock, Whiteville. 

Eastern — Miss Julia M. Jones, Warsaw. 

Green River — Mrs. J. A. Grayson, Rutherfordton. 

Kings Mountain — Mrs. Loula K. Connelly, Shelby. 

Little River — Miss Emma Kivett, Lihington. 

Mecklenburg and Cabarrus — Mrs. B. l.acj' Hoge. Concord. 

Mt Zion — Mrs. Lizzie Battle, Durham. 

Pee Dee — Mrs. Frank Bennett, Wadesboi-o. 

Piedmont — Mrs. J. C. Murchison, Greensboro. 

Pilot Mountain — Mrs. Harvey Crist, Salem. 

Raleigh — Mrs. John E. White, Cary. 

Robeson — Mrs. T. F. Toon, Lumberton. 

Sandy Creek — Mrs. T. H. Chapin, Pittsboro. 

South River — Mrs. Samuel A. Howard, Salemburg. 

Tar River — Mrs. W. B. Shaw, Henderson. 

Union — Mrs. D. A. Covington, Monroe. 

West Chowan — Miss Blanche Vann, Ahoskie. 

Haywood— Mrs. B. F. Hill, Clyde. 

Tuckaseigee — Mrs. S. H. Harrington, Franklin. 

Carolina — Miss Lida Carter, Angeline. 

Western Carolina — Miss Sallie Bright, Murphy. 

Neiv Found — Mrs. M. S. Buckner, Owenby, N. C. 



48 MINUTES OF THE 

With profound gratitude your Committee reports the best year of 
its history. In Greenville the societies took as their aim for the 
year 1898-1899 i-aising $7,500.00 for missions. To-day we report 
$8,746.62, an inca-ease of moi-e than $2,700.00 over last year. 

This result has been reached by steady growth along the lines of 
work formerly pursued. 

The most important feature of the year has been the welcome 
union of the societies of the west with those of the east, these 
societies having had no inconsiderable part in the sum mentioned 
above. 

The salary of our Yates Memorial Missionary, Mrs. T. C. Britton, 
of Soochow, China, was more than raised by the Christmas Offering; 
the enlarged interest in Home Missions was evinced by larger gifts 
during the week of self-denial, and especially in the many and val- 
uable boxes packed this fall for Frontier Missionaries, while the 
growth in contribution to State Missions in the last three years 
must be exceedingly gratifying to all believers in this basal work. 

Without going further into details of the work, in which the 
faithful efforts of twenty-five Associational Vice-Presidents have 
materially aided, we will let the figures given below speak for them- 
selves, feeling assured that all who have watched the remarkable 
growth of our Woman's Mission endeavor within the bounds of our 
State, Avill, with us, exclaim — The Lord hath done great things 
whereof we are glad. 

New societies, 66. 

Quarterly letters, 2,000. 

Other letters, 2,910. 

Postals, 35. 

Leaflets, blanks, etc., 15,805. 

Mite boxes, 498. 

Foreign Missions $2,462.71 

Home Missions 4,548.36 

State Missions 1,443.93 

Orphanage 233.87 

Ministerial education 28.27 

Expense fund 8.21 

Ministerial relief 18.57 

Sunday Schools 2.70 

8,746.62 
Respectfully submitted, 

Fannie E. S. Hkck, 

President. 
Mrs. J. A. Briggs, 

Corresponding Secretary. 

JNO. E. RAY, 

President. 
JNO. E. WHITE, 

Corresponding Secretary. 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 49 

The following- special committees were appointed : 

Destitution in Eastern Carolina. — C. W. Blanchard. C. M. Wall, E. H. 
Pruitt. B. S. Graves. B. W. Spilman, H. C. Moore. 

Missions at Manufacturing Centers. — L. R. Pruett, A. C. Irwin. Sid- 
ney Hamrick, J. A. McKaughan, M. E. Parrish, Jonathan Wood. 

Education in Western Carolina. — T. M. Honeycutt, C. S. Cashwell, 
G. M. Webb, R. L. Limrick, A. I. Justice, J. S, Woodard. 

Volunteer Mission Work.—'^. J. Porter, F. F. Scoggins, H. D. Wil- 
son. W. L. Bradley. C. D. Cole. 

The Convention then adjourned. 



SECOND DAY— Morning Session. 

AsHEvii.LE, IS^. C, December 7, 1899. 

The Convention reassembled at the hour appointed, and 
was led in devotional exercises bv W. C. Tyree, of Durham. 

The minutes of yesterday were read and approved. 

B. W. Spilman presented the following resolution, which 
was adopted : 

Resolved, That a committee of live be appointed to consider the mat- 
ter of providing an Educational Commission, said committee to report 
to the Convention in 1900. 

R G. Seymour, of Philadelphia, addressed the Conven- 
tion on the work of the American Baptist Publication 
Society. 

The Secretary read the following telegram : 

Louisville, Ky., December 6, 1899. 

President of the Baptist State Convention, Asheville, N. C. ; 

Greetings from North Carolina men at the Seminary. I Cor. i. 3-9. 

Arch C. Cree. 
John R. Moore. 

J. S. Hardaway was appointed to respond in behalf of 
the Convention. 
The followino: were recognized and welcomed to seats in 
4 



50 MINUTES OF THE 

the Convention : T. D. Lawrence, President of the Xormal 
and Collegiate Institute, of Asheville ; President Lodge, of 
the Limestone Institute, South Carolina ; B. P. Robertson, 
pastor of Gaffney Church, South Carolina ; Wm. L. Richards, 
new pastor at Hendersonville ; W. C. Allen, of South Carolina. 

President E. Y. Mullins, of Louisville, made an address 
on the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Subscrip- 
tions were taken for the Student's Aid Fund of the Serai- 
nary amounting to SS48.00. A cash collection of $9.8" was 
also taken for the same object. 

Thomas Hume presented the report of the Committee on 

FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The close of this great century is witnessing the most radical changes 
in the administration of the life of the world. How difficult sover it 
may be to separate between good and evil in political motives and plans, 
the believing heart rejoices that "the Lord reigneth,'" and the children of 
light must be prepared to exercise the wisdom tliat cometh from above 
and seize tlie great opportunity. While the nation is crossing its bridges 
is no time to define fully our missionary movement upon the isles of the 
eastern and western seas. But the outlook is hopeful because of the 
recoil from the alliance of clivirch and state, of priestcraft and corrup- 
tion. 

We can not fail to be moved by the blessing of God on the labors of 
our servants, and His, in the wide foreign field. Eight hundred and 
forty-five baptisms amongst the heathen are reported by them for the 
past year. The Board was untrammelled by debt at tlie end of the Con- 
ventional period. But our Southern Convention ordered an advance of 
twenty-five per cent in the outlay for the work. Eleven new mission- 
aries have been appointed ; two of them are North Carolina men, J. C. 
Owen and W. E. Crocker, both assigned to China. Only one worker 
has gone down in death, C. D. McCarthj', in Brazil, In North Mexico, 
Brazil and Cliina the signs of the divine favor are especially evident. 

The crying need is that our churches, our individual members, shall 
know this world which is to be redeemed, '"all the world," into which 
we are commanded to go and take the gospel of life and salvation. Wo 
must let in the light of heaven on the soul's secret movements and 
seek to incite in others the spirit of obedience to the plain command. 
But we must too provide instruction and help towards the understand- 
ing of this comprehensive and diversified subject. It is a serious ques- 
tion. What are the means used towards this end in the country church 
with its infrequent services ? 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 5! 

The Master's call is imperative. Our representatives have sounded 
the demand for a notable advance in view of the invitation of Provi- 
dence and our enlarged responsibility. While men and women are cry- 
ing, " Here am I, send me." shall we not rise to the height of this great 
argument with the money which the Lord has given us? It seems to 
us that the wise pastor has to a great degree the situation in his hands 
and the inspiration of the highest theme, "the world for Christ," to 
prompt his pleading. Thos. Hume, 

J. D. Brevard, 
C. L. Bagby. 
J. S. Bridges. 
R. E. White, 
W. H. Reddish, 

Committee. 

F. L. Cleaveland submitted the report of the Committee on 
WOMAN'S WORK. 

The following is a summary of the work of our woman's societies as 
submitted by their President, Miss Fannie Heck, of Raleigh. The com- 
mittee thinks it could best serve the Convention by incorporating this 
data into its report : 

'• I give herewith the results of the year's work of the Woman's Mis- 
sionary Societies. The growth this year has been such as to call forth 
our deepest gratitude, especially when we remember that this is the 
result of steady growth along tried and approved lines rather than 
transient effort. Contrasting this report with that of the first year's 
work of the committees, $1,000.00 with $8,764.00, brings forcibly to mind 
the increase in fourteen years. 

"In round numbers the Woman's Missionary Societies of our State 
have grown from fourteen to nearly four hundred and have given 
more than $52,000.00 to Home, State and Foreign Missions. Our un- 
varying aim is large things for Christ. We believe 1900 will see such 
things as we hardly dared to dream of even five short years ago." 

New societies 66 

Quarterly letters 2,000 

Other letters.- 2,910 

Postals 35 

Leaflets, blanks, etc 15, 805 

Mite boxes 498 

Foreign Missions _ $2, 462. 71 

Home Missions 4, 548. 36 

State Missions 1,443.93 

Orphanage 233. 87 

Ministerial Education . 28. 27 

Expense Fund ... 8.21 

Minister's Relief Fund 18. 57 

Sunday Schools 2.70 

8, 746. 62 



52 MINUTES OF THE 

The committee believes it expresses the thought of the entire Conven- 
tion in thanking the women of our churches for their efficient and 
valuable aid. F. L. Cleveland, 

A. W. Early, 
G. M. Duke, 
A. B. Smith, 
T. C. Bryson, 

Committee. 

After remarks by Thomas Hume and R. J. Willingham 
both reports were adopted. 

Adjournment with prayer by T. E. Skinner. 



SECOND DAY — Afternoon Session. 

The Convention was led in prayer by J. S. Smiley, of 
Swain County. 
J. A. Mundy presented the 

REPORT ON PERIODICALS. 

As our people advance in educational attainments, we depend more 
and more on periodical literature to inform our churches and to unify 
them in the Master's work. 

Your committee feel a deep sense of gratification at the increased 
circulation and more efficient equipment of our religious journals. 

The Biblical Recorder, our Convention organ, has justly won a place 
in the hearts of our people, that needs ouh^ to be mentioned in this re- 
port. In it we have the two essential elements of power and success — 
consecrated money and brains— serving the people and our Lord's 
Kingdom. Its record for more than threescore years has been one of 
loyalty to truth and duty. 

Charity and Children, the organ of our Orphanage; Wake Forest Stu- 
dent; Baptist Historical Papers and the North Carolina Baptist have 
kept pace with the advance movement and are doing a fine work in 
their respective spheres. 

And with them, we commend most heartily the Foreign Mission 
Journal, Our Home Field and the Seminary Magazine to the patronage 
of our people. J. A. Mundy, 

J. E. Ray. 
R. H. Herring, 
T. C. King, 
S. D. Swain, 
J. F. Vines, 

Committee. 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 53 

Eemarks were made by J. A. Mundy, J. S. Smiley, A. B. 
Thomas, J. W. Bailey, N. B. Broughton, W. R. Gwaltney, 
J. D. Hufham, and the report was adopted, 

Livingston Johnson offered the following resolution 
which was adopted : 

RESOLUTION. 

Whereas we believe that the relationship between the Convention 
and its organ, the Biblical Recorder, sliould be as close and vital as pos- 
sible. 

And Whereas, the extension of the Recorder's circulation among 
our people is of great concern to the work of the denomination; there- 
fore be it 

Resolved. That a committee of five from the Convention be appointed 
to act in behalf of the Convention as an Advisory Committee with the 
proprietors of the Recorder and its editor in its control and in de- 
termining plans for tlie increase of the Recorder's usefulness as the 
Denominational Organ and for the extension of its circulation among 
our people. 

On motion of ]^. B. Broughton the report on Wake For- 
est College is made special order for 11 o'clock to-morrow. 

The President appointed the following as the Biblical 
Recorder Advisory Committee : John E. White, W. L. Po- 
teat, R. T. Yann. T. M. Honeycutt, and W. R. Gwaltney. 

The Convention then adjourned. 



SECOND DAY— Evening Session. 

The Convention re-assembled at the hour appointed, and 
devotional exercises were conducted by A. H. Harnley, of 
New Bern, who read a part of Romans xii., and led in prayer. 

B. W. Spilman, for the Committee on Credentials, pre- 
sented the application of the recently formed Neuse Asso- 
ciation for admission into this body. The Association was 
received, and the messengers present received the hand of 
welcome by the President. 

The Convention was then addressed by J. M. Frost, Cor- 
responding Secretary of the Sunday School Board of the 
Southern Baptist Convention, Nashville, Tenn. 



54 MINUTES OF THE 

John E. White presented the following resolution, regard- 
ing the celebration of the year 1900 : 

RESOLUTION ON THE CELEBRATION OF THE YEAR 1900. 

Whereas, The Southern Baptist Convention at its session in Norfolk 
in 1898, inaugurated a movement for the celebration of the year 1900, 
as a memorial year in our Baptist churches, in which special effort is to 
be made to more fully inform them of the gracious fullness of the 
Divine blessings received during the past century, and to better organ- 
ize and equip them for the mighty work which lies before tliem in the 
century to come. 

And Whereas, the recent Convention in Louisville. Ky., further en- 
dorsed this movement and completed ai'rangements for its consumma- 
tion through a special committee: therefore be it 

Resolved, That in accordance with the provision in the plan adopted 
by the Southern Baptist Convention, we appoint a committee of five to 
cooperate with the committee of five appointed by the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention, and that our committee be requested to secure the ap- 
pointment of a committee of five in each of our District Associations, 
who, in turn, shall secure the appointment of a committee of three in 
each church within their bounds, all of said committees to cooperate 
with the General Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, 

Jxo. E. White. 

C. S. Blackwell offered the report on Home Missions, 
which, after discussion by F. H. Kerfoot, was adopted. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

Your committee on the work of the Home Board would report : 
During the Convention year we find tliat the Home Board has con- 
tinued its assistance at several points in the State, besides entering 
verj- heartily into cooperative support of our educational enterprises in 
Western North Carolina. We feel that this added token of interest and 
outlay on the part of the Board should stimulate our people to push up 
our Home Board contribution from $5,000 this year to $6,000 for next 
year. We advanced $1,200 the past year, we can add $1,000 even to 
that the coming year. There are many reasons why we sliould not 
forget the Home Board in our forward movement along all other lines. 
While we are more or less familiar with the splendid work being 
done in the mountain section of our own State by this Board, weshoidd 
not let our sympathies for it be limited by the boundary of our own 
need. We should know that a vast field far more destitute reaches be- 
yond our State lines and cries piteously and continuously for help; 
that into this field the Home Board has gone, and God has gone with it. 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 55 

The territory of the Home Board holds a varied and vast population. 
Besides our Indian population of 65,000, Texas alone has 200.000 Mexi' 
cans. The States liave o.OOO Cliinese, 40,000 Italians, 500,000 Germans, 
and 7.000.000 Negroes. In addition to this mixed multitude we have 
1,000.000 Cubans on our hands. With such conditions confronting it. 
the Home Board can not stop. It too must go forward In every step 
of its advance God has given a token of His bles.sing. At Louisville it 
made a report shovring the finger prints of '' God's good hand " upon it 
during the past year, thus : 

•'The number of missionaries emplo.yed this year was 653 against 467 
last year. Baptisms this year 6,552 against 4.739 last year. Total ad- 
ditions to churches this year 12,983 against 9,509 last year. Sundaj' 
Schools organized this year 512, with 14,768 teachers and ^lupils, against 
297 with 7.710 teachers and pupils last year." 

While our prayers and benedictions go with and rest upon the God- 
honored and heroic I. T. Tiehenor, the retiring leader of this noble 
work, we rise up and salute the incoming Secretary. Dr F. H. Kerfoot, 
and pledge him the love and loyalty of Nortii Carolina Baptists. 

Calvin S. Blackwell, 
G. H. Church, 
J. T. Betts. 
L. N. Chappell, 
A. B. Walker, 
J. L. Morgan, 

Committee. 

The President appointed the following as a coraniittee on 
celebration of 1900 : John E. White, A. E. Brown, L. John- 
son, C. W. Scarborough, J. C. Caddell. 

The Convention adjourned with benediction by A. C. 
Barron, of Charlotte. 



THIRD DAY— Morning Session. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by Gr. H. Church, 
of Burlington, who read and commented on a part of Ephe- 
sians, sixth chapter. 

The minutes of yesterday were read and approved. 

The motion was adopted to reconsider the action to make 
Wake Forest College special order for 11 a. ra. to-day, and 
it was made the special order for from 12.30 till adjourn- 
ment. 



56 MINUTES OF THE 

On motion, the following constitutional amendment was 
adopted : 

Insert in section 5 the words, " Kerfoof s Parliamentary Law."' in- 
stead of tlie words " Mell's Parliamentary Practice." 

J. H. Weaver, pastor of Central Methodist Church, Ashe- 
ville, was recognized and welcomed. 

C. W. Blanchard presented the report of the Committee 
on Destitution in Eastern Carolina: 

REPORT ON DESTITUTION IN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA. 

In Eastern North Carolina the Baptists of the State find their largest 
area of destitution. It is found mainly in the counties covered by the 
Tar River, the Eastern, the Atlantic and the Neuse Associations. 

In the Tar River Association there is much destitution of real evan- 
gelical preaching, the territory' being largely pre-occupied by anti- 
nomian leaders. This opposition is hard to overcome among the older 
members of the families, but is giving way in the sweep of intelligence 
and evangelical work among the young. Much attention should be 
paid to this territory by our Board of Missions. 

In our opinion tlie greatest mission work of the Eastern Association 
is that of development of churches already constituted, but surely there 
is yet unoccupied territory in this section. Much work is yet to be done 
ere we are ready to yield it to fate. 

The largest, neediest and most promising mission field in the State is 
that covered by the Neuse and Atlantic Associations. There are ten 
fertile counties here, with a population of about 200,000. and only about 
3.000 members of Baptist churches. We now have about 40 organized 
churches, are cultivating 30 mission points that promise to become 
churches, and fail to reach not less than 50 others that are inviting to 
our preachers. 

On this territory the Mormons have placed 17 missionaries. Last year 
the Baptists partially supported 8 men. This year we are asked to sus- 
tain 12 men. We believe it will be wise for the Convention to push the 
work in this section without stint of men or means. The men now on 
the field have a firm grasp of the work, but they need reinforcement 
and encouragement. C. W. Blanchard. 

HiGHT C. Moore, 
C. M. Wall. 
B. W. Spilman, 

Committee. 

Remarks were made by C. W. Blanchard and M. L. Kes 
ler, and the report was adopted. 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 57 

L. R. Pruett submitted the report of the Committee on 
Manufacturing Centers, as follows : 

REPORT ON MISSIONS AT MANUFACTURING CENTERS. 

This Southland, and especially North Carolina, is rapidly becoming a 
great manufacturing section. A larger number of industries, especially 
that of cotton, are now being established than ever before in our fair 
land. 

New mills are going up in many parts of our own State. These fac- 
tories employ men. women and children. In the main these peoi^le 
have moved to the city or town, and have left their country homes and 
their country churches. A large number of this growing population is 
now without Baptist pastors. Baptist Sunday Schools and Baptist church 
houses. This being the condition, the duty of this Convention and the 
Baptists of the State can be seen at a glance. 
In the face of this fact, your committee recommends the following : 
First, that the pastoi-s and churches in tlie manufacturing centers 
utilize local talent when possible, aided by the State Mission Board 
when necessary, which will often require only an outlay of expenses 
for a building in which to worship and the necessary current expenses. 
' Second, that the Board seek to provide for every town and factory 
community a pastor and church privileges as soon as possible. 

M. E. Parrish, 
A. C. Irwin. 
J. A. McKaughan, 
' S. A. Hamrick, 

Jonathan Wood, 
L. R. Pruett. 

Committee. 

Remarks were made by L. R. Pruett, and the report was 
adopted. 

At this point the President gave the hand of special wel- 
come to Adam Corn and John H. Justice, aged members of 
the body, w^ho were at the organization of the Western Con- 
vention. A freewill offering of $15.98 was tendered brother 
Corn. 

W. E. Wilkins offered the report of the Committee on 

EDUCATION IN WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA. 

Your Committee on Education in Western North Carolina note that: 
Western North Carolina includes twenty-five counties with a popula- 



58 MINUTES OF THE 

tion of about 300.000. Of this number about 50,000 are Baptists. Esti- 
mating that tliere are 60.000 children of school age in this section some 
40,000 are Baptists or under Baptist influences. Evidently the future 
of our Baptist Zion will be largely determined by what we do or fail to 
do for this army of 40,000 children. We note with gratitude — 

1. That the public schools are now doing far more for the develop- 
ment of this host than ever before. 

2. That Bapti-sts have felt the pressing needs of the young people of 
the west by providing Mars Hill College. Fruitland Institute, Taylors- 
ville High School and Belleview; and soon there are to be Associational 
schools at Sylva in Jackson County, and at Bakersville in Yancej'. 

3. That there is now a general awakening in educational lines and that 
open doors are calling loudly for cooperation from the brotherhood. A 
key, humanly speaking-, to the new Western North Carolina is held bj' 
the Assornational High School. Shall we possess it? 

4. We call special attention to the offer of Mr.M. C. Treat, of Washing- 
ton, Pennsylvania, who has placed a loan fund of $000 for young min- 
isters who wish to attenil Mars Hill College. This enables 10 young 
ministers to enter school each year. May the Lord richly bless our ben- 
efactor ! 

But while something is being done it is not even enough to prevent 
loss to our Baptist cause. We heartily recommend tlie Educational 
.section in the report of the Board of Missions and Sunday Schools and 
earnestly urge that every $1-00 invested in high schools here now will 
do as much as $0.00 a few years from now. The opportunity now 
open, which may not be open many yea-s, is illustrated by the expe- 
rience of our brethren in Yancey County. They were offered the 
plot of ground and one-tenth of the amount needed to build a §3.500.00 
Associational High School. After waiting a year or two on our breth- 
ren the donor made tlie same proposition to another denomination 
and now a $(>.000.00 Higli Scliool marks the last opportunity of our peo- 
ple in a county where three-fourths of the people are Baptists. 

Respectfully. T. M. Honeycutt. 

C. S. Cashwell, 
G. M. Webb, 

R. L. LiMRICK, 

A. I. Justice, 
J. S. Woodward, 

Covimittee. 

Remarks by T. M. Hone\'cutt, A. E Brown, A. I. Justice, 
and John E. White and the report was adopted. 

W. R. jGrwaltney presented the report of the Trustees of 
Wake Forest College as follows: 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 59 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE. 

Prosperity and growth have characterized the past year. The ma- 
triculation during 1898-9 was the largest in the history of the College. 
It is likely that this number will be passed before the pi-esent session 
shall end. Fifteen more have matriculated already than at this time last 
year. At no time has more faithful work been done or has better order 
prevailed. The health of the students and of the community continues 
excellent. A young minister of high promise died in October, but he 
carried with him the seeds of disease when he went to Wake Forest. 

The changes in the personnel of the Board and Faculty have been few. 
Judge E. W. Timberlake has been make a Trustee in the place of Mr. 
^V. H. Mitchell. Prof. J. L. Lake has been elected to the chair of Phys- 
ics and Prof. J. F. Lanneau has been assigned to the Chair of Applied 
Mathematics and Astronomy, these two Departments having been sep- 
arated at the last meeting of the Board. Prof. C. E. Brewer and Assist- 
ant Prof. C. W. Paschal have been given one year's leave of absence. 
The place of the former is filled temporarily by Professor Lake; that of 
the latter by Mr. W. B. Daniel. 

The Law School continues to grow in popularity and in the number 
of its matriculates. Though onlj' in its sixth year, it is already widely 
recognized as one of the be.st in the South. 

Comparison between the last catalogue and those published before it 
will reveal the fact that the standard of the College for graduation has 
been raised in a marked degree. The standard for entrance, also, is 
gradually being elevated. That this can be done is due to the increasing 
number and improving work of our academies. In this connection it 
is gratifying to note the success of several Associational academies 
already established and the discussions in several Associations as to the 
establishment of others. Few more important matters claim the atten- 
tion of North (^'arolina Baptists than the founding of first rate acade- 
mies under the control and within the limits of their Associations. 

Some of the needs of the College are imperative. Not to supply these 
at a very early day will be to begin to fall back in efficiency as com- 
pared with other colleges. A general effort for the increase of means 
at the disposal of the Trustees for improvement and equipment ought 
not to be long deferred. 

The report was discussed b}'^ C. W. Scarborough, J, B. 
Carlyle, and ordered printed in the minutes. 

The Convention adjourned with benediction by M. L. 
Richards, of Hendersonville. 



6o MINUTES OF THE 

THIRD DAY— Evening Session. 

The opening exercises included the reading of the 122nd 
Psalm, by W. F. Watson, prayer by G. M. Duke. 

D. P. Bridges presented the report on State Missions. 
which was adopted. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

Our State work lies at the foundation of all our work. We are mov- 
ing forward along all our lines of work. This advancement can not be 
permanent unless our State work is in the fore-front of this forward 
movement. This year our Board has employed 100 missionaries in our 
State work, together with the great work done by our noble band of 
volunteer mission workers. Your committee recommends that our 
Board lay out its work for the next j'ear on a basis of §20,000, and that 
our volunteer work be carried on as before. In order for our Board to 
do this the cliurches must stand by the work in their prayers and in 
enlarged contributions. Brethren, here ai'e our destitute fields in the 
east, our manufacturing centers and our educational work in the west. 
Let us then stand by all these departments of our work. 

E. A. Myers, 
R. O. Pernell, 

E. M. LiGHTFOOT, 
J. L. WiLKIE, 

D. p. Bridgks, 

J. A. HOYLE, 

Comviiitee. 

W. A. Smith offered the report on the Orphanage as 
follows: 

REPORT ON BAPTIST ORPHANAGE. 

Every Baptist who is at all acquainted with our Orphanage and its 
good work and splendid management has a holy pride in this institu- 
tion. It is indeed the expression of Christian love in a most becoming 
manner. Its great demands and glorious work calls forth sympathj' 
and support from the most lukewarm and illiberal Cliristian. It often 
breaks the way for greater liberality for all other objects of the Con- 
vention. 

There are now about 175 children in the Orphanage. About 200 have 
been enrolled during the year but twenty-five have been honorably 
dismissed. 

The health of the children has been excellent. Tlieir spiritual inter- 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 6l 

ests also are tenderly watched after, and a large number of them are 
members of the churcli. 

The management of the Orphanage is systematic and entirely satis- 
factory. The discipline is gentle, but firm. That wise and good man- 
ager and his noble Christian wife seem to be divinely suited and ap- 
pointed to this work. 

Tlie §750 debt on the General Manager's house, which had not been 
provided for at last Convention, has been paid. 

The second nursery building (the bequest of Dr. R. D. Fleming, 
supplemented by his widow) has been completed, and will be ready for 
occupancy next Monday. This building, however, will only supply the 
necessary accommodation for the present number of children who have 
been hitherto so much crowded. 

The present needs of the Orphanage certainly ought to claim our at- 
tention. Not that the orphans in charge lack for comfortable accom- 
modation, but that so many worthy applicants can not be received for 
lack of capacity. We, your committee, therefore recommend to the 
Convention that steps be taken for the erection and furnishing of other 
suitable buildings that we may not lack for capacity. A Mills Memo- 
rial Building has been spoken of and we believe that such a building 
might be supplied during the ensuing year very easily if only the 
proper efforts should be make. The necessity for enlarged capacity is 
evidenced by the fact that over fifty worthy applications have been 
made through the Conventional year, which could not be received for 
lack of room. If we had the necessary buildings we believe an increase 
of twenty-five per cent of the current expenses would provide for twice 
the number of orphans we now have in the institution. Our people 
seem to be ready and willing to furnish food and raiment, but are slow 
to provide shelter. All the buildings we now have were supplied by 
special funds, the most of which was given by individuals. 

We note with pleasure the continued usefulness of, and the increased 
interest in, Charity a?td Children. This paper now visits between 
five and six thousand homes. It returns value received for the subscri- 
ber in good reading matter, and information about the Orphanage 
work, which is not supplied from any other source, besides being of 
direct pecuniary aid to the Orphanage . 

RespectfuUy submitted. W. A. Smith, 

C. B. Paul, 
J. L. Shinn, ^ 

S. D. SWAIM, 

J. A. White, 
W. C. Stradley, 

Committee. 

Remarks by W. A. Smith, J. B. Boone, and N. B. 
Brouo-hton. Subscriptions amounting to $2,585 were taken 



62 MINUTES OF THE 

for the Mills Memorial Building. The report was then 
adopted. 

O. L. Stiingfield submitted the report on the Baptist Fe- 
male University as follows : 

REPORT OX THE BAPTIST FEMALE UNIVERSITY. 

The year 1899 will mark an epoch in tlie history of the Baptist de- 
nomination in this State in educational work. On the 27tli of Septem- 
ber last the Baptist Female University of North Carolina opened its 
doors for the education of our women with an enrollment of 180, of 
which 120 are boarders. Two generations of Baptists have desired to 
see what has this year been accomplished in the e.stablishment of this 
institution. Ten years ago at the Convention in Henderson this work 
was started. It was then resolved " that the time had come when the 
Baptists of the State should establish a school for young women of high 
grade for the advancement of the higher education of the women of 
our land." The wisdom of this action of the Convention has been jus- 
tified by the splendid opening which the University lias had. 

The number of pupils who applied for admission at the opening of 
the University were greater than the Board of Trustees had expected 
or had provided for, and it became necessary to secure additional ac- 
commodations for the patronage of the school. This was done by the 
purchase of the Adams properly, adjoining the University grounds, (a 
handsome private residence of twenty-six rooms,) and also by making 
adilitional dormitory room in the main building. This purchase and 
additional room, together with the repairs, furniture and furnishings 
necessary, required an additional indebtedness of $15,000 to that al- 
ready incurred, which was $30,000. Tlie Trustees were loth to incur 
this debt, but they saw no way to avoid it and be true to the trust com- 
mitted to them. 

The University now has comfortable accommodations for 150 board- 
ers — 30 more than are now enrolled, but it is expected that these 
accommodations will be taken up before the end of the present session. 
The property which the University has cost between $80,000 and 
890,000, but this property could not now be duplicated for $100,000. Indeed 
no school in the State has superior accommodations for the comfort of 
its patrons tlian our school at Raleigh. Its faculty is composed of five 
men and tliirteen women, who have been selected witli great care for 
the positions tliey occupy, and are eminent in their profession as 
teachers. 

The expenses of the University, though of necessity large, we are 
glad to report are fully met by the income of tlie institution, but it is 
necessary to provide for the debt incurred for the buildings and their 
furnishings. This should be done as early as possible by the denomi- 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. " 63 

nation, to the end that education at the University may be cheapened 
and this menace to tliis youngest child of the Convention may be 
removed. 

During the year there has been contributed for the building and 
furnishings $8,393.78 in cash and $3,861.50 in subscriptions, making a 
total of $11,255.28. On account of sickness our financial Secretary has 
done very little \A'ork during the la.st two months, and will not be able 
to enter the fieM befoi'e January. Bro. C. A. G. Thomas. past<>r of the 
church in Faj'etteville, has kindly consented to aid in the great work 
until the health and strength of our financial Secretary shall be fully 
restored. 

THE woman's building FUND. 

It was a gracious providence that our women engaged to put forth 
special efforts during this year to aid in the great work. They have 
been led by one of the foremost of our Southern women. During the 
year they have secured $1,693.20 in cash, and $1,176.50 in subscriptions, 
making a total of $2,869.70. This amount and the amount secured 
through the Financial Secretary make a grand total of cash and sub- 
scriptions $14,124.98. The amount of cash reported by Miss Susan W. 
G. Clark, the treasurer of the Woman's Executive Committee, is far 
from representing all that the women did. The amount wovild have 
been much larger bui for the fact that very often the money meant to 
be given to Miss Heck was given to our Financial Secretary. The work 
done during the year by our women has been highly satisfactory to the 
trustees and friends of the school. We rejoice greatly in the fact that 
Miss Fannie E. S. Heck is now organizing our woinen into an '* Educa- 
tional Union." We most heartily commend this work to the women of 
the State. With our women organized in the great work of education, 
and especially the education of our young women, the good that will 
come to the homes of North Carolina can not be estimated. 

THE PRESSING DEMANDS THAT ARE NOW UPON US. 

Our trustees have not finished the Baptist Female University. Thej^ 
have only begun it. Both of the buildings are filled with earnest young 
Avomen. with a fine prospect that twice the nvimber now enrolled will 
be in attendance next September. What shall be done about the debt 
upon the property, and about erecting another building is to be decided 
by the men and women comijosing this Convention. 

The Baptist people have never failed in a great crisis, and we are 
willing to trust them to put forth greater efforts than ever, that this 
great work may move on rapidly till fully established. 

In view of the pressing demands upon us at this time to provide am- 
ple room for the young women of the State who wish to enter the Bap- 
tist Female University, and to keep these great advantages at the low 
charges at which they are now offered, we recommend that all possible 



64 MINUTES OF THE 

efforts be put forth to secure during the coming year $35,000, to paj' the 
indebtedness on the property. 

Most respectfully submitted, O. L. Stringfield, 

E. Allison, 
R. A. Sentell, 
A. H. Hartley. 

. Committee. 

Remarks were made by J. C. Blasingame, J. W. Bailey, 
and O. L. Stringfield, and the report was adopted. 
Adjourned. 



FOURTH DAY— MoRNiNCx Session. 

Ashetille, X. C, December 9, 1899. 

Devotional exercises were conducted by Adam Corn, who 
read from the second chapter of Acts. 

Minutes of yesterday were read, corrected and approved. 

W. N. Jones presented the report of the Committee on 
Place and Preacher which was adopted as follows : 

Place— Raleigh. 

Preacher — W. M. Vines; alternate, W. C. Tyree. 

A. M. Simms made the following report which was 
adopted : 

REPORT ON COOPERATION. 

The work of cooperation on the part of the Home Mission Society of 
New York, the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion and this State Convention with the colored Baptists of North Car- 
olina seems to be producing good results, and we therefore commend 
it to the Convention for its continuance. 

By reference to page 30 of the minutes of this Convention for 1898 
you will see that the amount whicli this Convention is to spend in this 
work for the current year is .$533.00. 

Respectfully submitted, A. M. Simms, 

Geo. J. DowELL. 
J. J. Douglas, 
A. H. Porter, 
T. B. Justice, 

Committee. 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 65 

On motion of M. L. Kesler the order of business was 
amended as follows: 

10.80 a. til.— Ministerial Relief. 
11.00 ;i. 111.^ — Sunday Schools. 
12.00 ni.— Ministerial Education. 
13. oO p. m. — Histoi-ical Papers. 

1.00 p. 111. — Obituaries. 

1.30 p. ni. — Miscellaneous Business. 

R. 11. Griffith, of Henderson ville, was introduced to the 
Convention and welcomed to a seat in the body. 

J.S. riar(hiway offered the report on Ministerial Relief as 
follows : 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 

It is most gratifying to your committee to be able to report that the 
3'ear closing with the meeting of tliis Convention has been, in many 
repects.tlie most .successful year in the history of the work of the Ministe- 
rial Relief Board. Tlie receipts have more than met the Board's obli- 
gations, and fifteen worthy servants of the Lord have received some 
substantial token of the denomination's desire to do its part by those 
who have wrought well in their day and are now simply waiting for 
the call to come up higher. 

Your committee would urge upon the pastors of the Convention the 
importance of informing the churches about the Board and its work 
and taking, at least, one collection during the year for the benefit of 
these aged, indigent servants of God. 

Your committee would also suggest that pastors and laymen com- 
municate to the Secretaiy or President of the Board the names of all 
worthy persons legitimately falling within the province of the work of 
the Board. 

J. S. Hardaway, 
W. F. Watson, 
S. J. Porter. 
I. S. Barbee, 
R. E. White, 

Committee. 

J. F. McDuffie, Corresponding Secretary of the Ministe 
rial Relief Board, presented the annual report of the Board, 
which was ordered printed in the minutes. 



66 MINUTEvS OF THE 

REPORT OF MINISTERIAL RELIEF BOARD. 

This department of our work has been signally blessed; and we have 
much to be grateful for in the appreciation shown by the Convention, 
in the marked increase of interest shown and taken bj' the brethren, 
and in the considerable increase in contributions by the different 
churches, many of which have not before been doing anything for these 
old brethren. We have had many letters of inquiry to answer, wliich 
is to the mind of the Board a marked inci'ease of interest. 

Two great needs are before us: First, we need to know of the worthy 
needy ones. A look on the fields, will convince any casual observer of 
this fact. Here and there are weary ones, bowed down with care and 
anxiety, waiting for help from Christ's .servants who ob-s^erve His law of 
love "Bear ye one another's burdens." They are helped bj^ the few who 
have been necessitated to realize it to be cumbersome in the extreme, 
many of whom perhaps have never heard of this Board. It would be a 
source of comfort in such ca-«es, many tiines. to help each other, if we 
only knew of it. and to know it would be only a little effort put forth 
frequently on the part of tiiose who are in touch with the work. Again, 
we need more who are in .sympathy with this work. To walk in the 
path of a realized duty brings the sweetest comfort and joy to any 
soul. Results are frequently hid behind the curtain of God"s provi- 
dence. In a visionary cottage stained with the effects of time lives 
the old veteran of the cross. On the table lies the Sword with which 
he has fought nianj' battles. On the strands of time, here and there, 
are the effects of his struggles which God has enabled him to over- 
come. But by this old table stands the old cupboard scantily and 
p )orly provided for. How often the old man tliinks of better days gone 
by. and wonders why tliis state of affairs. He sleeps and wakes only 
to find it worse and worse as the days go by To help him would be 
only perhaps to deprive ourselves of a few luxuries. 

The demands upon us for their support is oblijiatory when we rightly 
consider their sa-'rifi-'es and work. They erected the foundation upon 
which we are buihling. The best of their lives were spent in laying 
this foundation. By helping them it begets a spirit of benevolence 
within us that come from no other work in our Convention. Largely 
thire is going out a spirit of sympathy and love for these old brethren 
that developes itself in such gifts as result in larger contributions to 
our other work. They are helped by our helping: and we are in like 
manner blessed by helping them. 

We are very much encouraged by the efforts of our brethren during 
this Conventional year. God has signally blesst'd us in the work. We 
have received many letters of inquiry, and more blanks have been sent 
out than in recent years, as the result of which we have recf-ived two ad- 
ditional beneficiaries, and three others await the action of the Board. 
There hav^e been no deaths, so far as we have heard, of anj- of our ben- 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 67 

eficiaries during tliis year. Tliere are now fourteen beneficiaries on the 

Board. Bro. Wm. W. Reid, of Dillsboro, and sister Elvia. widow of 

Bro. G. C. I'aines. of Orton, N. C, have 'been received since last report. 

Respe tfully submitted. Rev. W. C. Tyree, 

.1. F. MacDuffie. President. 

CortL'Hjiondmg Secretary. 

Report of Treasurer of Ministerial Relief Board for the 
Year Ending December 2. 1899. 

1898. Received. 

Dec. 7. Balance.- |285. 19 

1899. 

April 11. Interest ,- 7.50 

May 19. 1.30 

31. 10.50 

July 10. 60.00 

15. J. D. Boushall, Treasurer 300.00 

Sept. 16. Interest 12.75 

Oct. 2. Cool Springs Church... 4.65 

12. Interest 6. 00 

14. D.L.Gore -... 100.00 

16. Interest 7.50 

19. J. D. Boushall, Treasurer 450.00 

Dec. 2. 290.00 

1899. Paid Out. 

To Rev.W.W.Reed .- §50.00 

Rev. N.H. Moss 50.00 

Mrs. Rhoda Churchill 70. 00 

Mrs. C.F. Humphries 70.00 

Mrs. B.H. Phillips 70.00 

Mrs. Harriet Spivey - - - 70. 00 

Mrs. Jane Barlow 20.00 

Mrs. H.C. Register 45.00 

Mrs. Sibby Combs ..-, - 45.00 

Mrs. E. H. Best 45. 00 

Rev. Wm. Harris 45.00 

Rev. Solomon Blackburn 45. 00 

Rev. John Huglies. 29.65 

Rev.J.H.Levvelliu 35.00 

Mrs.Elvia Caines. 30.00 

Expenses of Corrc-^ponding Secretary 9. 80 

P.I.B.Fund 381.55 

Balance to credit General Fund 424. 39 

1,535.39 1,535.39 
Disbursed 629.06 



68 MINUTES OF THE 

P. I. B. FUND. 

Loan $500.00 

- - - 150.00 

- -- - 350.00 

425.00 

250 . 00 

200.00 

100.00 

150.00 

2,125.00 

Balance on hand 181.13 



2, 300. 13 



Respeotfully submitted to the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina, T. E. Cheek, 

Treasurer. 

We have examined the report herewith submitted and certify that 
same is correct to the best of our knowledge and belief. 
This December 4, 1899. H. A. Foushee, 

R. H. RiGSBEE, 

Auditors. 

John E. White presented the report of the Treasurer of 
the Convention and it was adopted. 

REPORT OF TREASURER. 

STATE MISSIONS. 

By amount received .$20,074.05 

To balance .-.- §1,069.22 

Edwards & Broughton, printing Minutes 50.00 

Higlit C. Moore, sahiry as Rec. Sec 25. 00 

N. B. Broughton, salary as Rec. Sec 25. 00 

Amount advanced from Beulah Association _ . 50. 00 

Fuel, lights, etc.. 34.83 

Jno. E. White, expenses as Statistical Sec... 10.00 

Stamps, stationer}' and office supplies 134.77 

Part expen-.es W. M. S 21.76 

B. W. Spilman, salary, expenses as S. S. Miss. 718.89 

Jno. E. White, salary as Cor. Sec 815.00 

Amount paid on cooperation 512. 65 

Amount forward 3,467.12 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 69 

Amount forward $3, 467 12 $80, 074. 03 

Traveling expenses of Vol. Miss. 116.52 

Jno. E. White, traveling expenses 154.10 

Rent of Mission Rooms 28. 83 

J. D. Bou!-ha 11 . salary as Treasurer 75 . 00 

Miss Lena Partin, salary as Stenographer 76. 00 

Revenue stamps 15.90 

Printing and advertising 82. 25 

H. B. Duffy, Tabernacle church. New Bern.. 100.00 

G. H. Saddleson. Southern Pines church 100.00 

Amount paid Missionaries 15, 575. 77 

Balance 28;^ . 04 

20,074.03 20,074.03 



FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

By a mount received §9 291 . 42 

B}' amount sent direct 1 348 92 

To Edwards & Broughton, printing Minutes $40. 00 

Rev. J. C. Owen, traveling expenses Mis tour 25.00 

Rev. A . J. Barton , traveling expenses Mis. tour 6. 75 

J. Z. Eure, traveling expenses Mis. tour 10.00 

C.R.Taylor, traveling expenses Mis. tour 10.00 

J. D. Boushall, salary as Treasurer 60 . 00 

Fuel, lights, stationery, etc 20.00 

Stamps and oflfice supplies 52.55 

Expenses W. M. S . 76. 84 

Jno. E. Wliite, salary as Cor. Sec 425 . 00 

Jno. E. White, traveling expenses 105. 35 

Miss Lena Partin. salary as Stenographer 70.00 

Rent of Mission Rooms 40.00 

Printing and advertising 76.49 

Sent Foreign Mission Board 7, 746 . 02 

Amount sent direct 1,348.92 

Balance 521. 42 

10,640.34 10.640.34 



HOME MISSIONS. 

By amount received |5, 6O8. 72 

By amount sent direct 161.90 

To Edwards & Broughton. printing Minutes $40.00 

J. D. Boushall, salary as Treasurer 50. 00 

Fuel, lights, etc _ 20. 00 

Expenses W. M. S 52.01 

Amount forward 162. 01 



70 MINUTES OF THE 

Amount forward 

To Stamps, stationery and office supplies... 

Jno. E. White, salary as Cor. Sec 

Jno. E. White, traveling expenses 

Miss Lena Parti n, salary as Stenographer . . 

Printing 

Rent - 

Amount sent Home Mission Boai'd 4, 600. 00 

Amount sent direct 1 , . 16 1 . 90 

Balance - - 87. 38 



$162. 01 


S5, 


770 (12 


55.00 






450. 00 






55. 00 






76.00 






100. 00 






23.33 







5,770.62 5,770.62 



EDUCATION. 

Balance .$431 . 67 

By amount received 2, 840. 09 

To Edwards & Broughton, printing Minutes $20.00 

J. D. Boushall, salary as Treasurer 15. 00 

Vouchers by Dr. John Mitchell 2, 467. 46 

Balance - 769 . 30 



3,271.76 3,271.76 



SUNDAY SCHOOLS AND COLPORTAGE. 

Balance -.- §22.00 

By amount received §261 . 06 

To paid Rev. B. W. Spilman, salary and expenses 

as Field Secretary 350. 65 

Balance 1 1 1 . 59 



372. 65 372. 65 



MINISTERIAL HKHEF FUND. 

By amount received $1 , 059. 07 

T. E. Cheek, Treasurer SI , 050. 00 

Balance 9 . 07 

1,059.07 1,059.07 



Total value this fund 3,306.12 



STUDENTS AID FUND (LOUISVILLE). 

By amoun t received §60 . 37 

To paid Jno. R. Sampey . Treasurer . ^ $60. 37 



60.37 60. 3 r 



Amount sent direct, estimated 500. 00 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 7 I 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE. 

Balance .t212.74 

By cash receipts of store - 10, 047. (U 

To Printing Minutes of Convention .$20. 00 

Miss P. Ellington, .salarj' Oct. and Nov 20. 00 

J. D. Boushall. salary as Treasurer 50.00 

Donations and discounts 225. 13 

Furniture and fixtures 67.75 

Postage, fuel and lights - _ . 191. 59 

Freight, drayage, etc 200. 27 

H. L. Watson, salarj' as clerk 600.00 

Miss Lena Partin, salary as stenographer... 76.00 

Rent 200. 00 

Printing and stationery. . 103.62 

Advertising .50.79 

Literature, books, etc 7, 837. 91 

Balance 617.32 

10.260.38 10,260.38 
SUMMARY. 

State Missions _ _. $20,074.03 

Foreign Missions.. 10,640.34 

Home Missions 5, 770. 62 

Education 3, 271 . 76 

Sunday Schools and Colportage ... 372.65 

Ministerial Relief Fund 1,059.07 

Students Aid Fund (Louisville) .560. .37 

Baptist Bookstore 10,260.38 

Total actual cash contributions . 52, 009. 22 

Respectfully subniitte '. 

J. D. Boushall, 
Treasurer Baptist Stute Convention. 

I hereby certify that I have examined the books of J. D. Bou.shall, 
Treasurer of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, for tlie 
past conventional year, comparing the same with the acknowledgments 
in the Biblical Recorder. I find all accounts with the various objects 
of the Convention to be correct, and disbursements supported by pro])er 
vouchers. Walters Durh.am, 

Auditor North Carolina Baptist State (.'onvention. 

Remarks by J. S. Harclaway, W. F. Watson, W. C. Tyree 
and the report on Ministerial Relief was adopted. 

AV. H. Rich presented the report of the Committee to 
nominate Sunday School and Colportage Committee, which 
was adopted. (See list of Boards.) 



72 MINUTES OF THE 

Thomas Carrick presented the report of the Committee to 
nominate Board of Education, which was ado[)ted. (See 
list of Boards). 

T. B, Moseley presented the report of the Committee on 
Sunday Schools as follows : 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS AND COLPORFAGE. 

The work of our North Carolina Sunday School Committee has been 
eminently successful. The institutes under the inanagement of Bro. 
B. W. Spilman, Sunday School Field Secretary, have aroused 
and quickened a widespread interest in the work. He has attended, in 
the last year, sixty-eight meetings in the interest of Sunday Schools, 
and has personally conducted fifty-seven. We feel that we can not 
speak too highly of his self-sacriticing labors— facing and enduring the 
trials that have attended the work, and giving to it, for a scant remu- 
neration, a whole-hearted and efficient service. 

The benefits to our cause at large, resulting from tlie earnest, faith- 
ful efforts of our Fiir'ld Secretary, can, in part at least, be seen when we 
find that an increased interest in Sunday Schools means a more open 
door, and a greater influx of devoted, intelligent Christians into our 
churches. 

Your committee begs leave to urge that the Convention instruct the 
Sunday School Committee, through its Field Seer etar}-. to push forward 
.the colportage work in every way practical. 

J. D. Moore. 
T. B. Moseley, 
J. F. Parrott, 
G. N. Co WAX. 
M. A. Love, 

Committee. 

Remarks by T. B. Moseley, John E. Ray, N. B. Brough- 
ton, and the report was adopted. 

Livingston Johnson presented the following resolution: 

Resolved. That this Convention rejoices in the prosperity of the Ox- 
ford Seminai-y for girls and the Chowan Female Institute, and wishes 
them hearty God-speed in their blessed work of helping to lift up the 
girls of our denomination. 

On motion, F. P. Hobgood of Oxford, and C. W. Scar 
borough of Murfreesboro, were given five minutes each to 
present their respective institutions. 

The report of Committee to nominate the Ministerial Re- 
lief Board was received and adopted. (See list of Boards.) 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 73 

John E. White presented the following report, which was 
adopted ; 

CARRENDER WILL CASE. 

Your committee to whicli was committed the adjustment of the 
Conventioirs interest in the will of Levvis Carrender. deceaseil, of Yad- 
kin County, begs leave to report : 

Tliat we liave arrived at a compromise with ])arties involved by 
which the Convention receives $1,000.00 for the transfer of its rights 
under the will to the plaintiff in the suit. This transfer has beencom- 
summated ; the case is removed from litigation and the Treasurer of the 
Convention has in hand ^lOO.OO in cash and §500.00 note payable Sep- 
tember 1, 1900. 

Under the terms of the will the Convention was enjoined to place its 
bequest at interest and the interest from the same to be used in State 
Mission work. 

We recommend that the Treasurer of the Convention be instructed 
to execute a loan of the money and note now in his hands to the Bap- 
tist Book Store at six per cent per annum. 

Jno. E. White. 
W. N. Jones, 

J. D. BOUSHALL. 

Committee. 

John E. White presented the following resolution, which 
was adopted : 

Resolved, That in view of the peculiar significance attached to the 
closing year of the century, and in view of lamentable lack of full, ac- 
curate and reliable statistics of Baptist work and numerical strength 
in North Carolina, that the Convention elect brethren Huf ham au'l T. M. 
Pittiuan statistical secretaries for the year 1900, with instructions to 
collect and report to the next session of the Convention full, accurate 
and reliable statistics of the Baptists of North Carolina and such his- 
torical data as deserves perpetuation in our records. 

Resolved 2d, That the Boai"d of Missions be instructed to appropriate 
$150 to defray the expenses of the work. 

Jno. E. White. 

R. T. Vann presented the following resolution, which was 
adopted ; 

Resolved, That the Baptist State Convention express its high appre- 
ciation of the faithful, effi lent and self-denying service rendered by 
Miss Fannie E. S. Heck in securing funds for the Baptist Female Uni- 
versity, and that we cordially commend her to the sympathj^ and co- 
operation of all our people. 



74 MINUTES OF THE 

The President appointed the following comtnittee of five 
to consider the appointment of an educational commission 
to report in 1900: B. W. Spilman, O. E. Taylor, J. C. 
Scarboro, J. A. Campbell, W. J. Ferrell. 

J. F. Davis presented the following resolution, which was 
adopted : 

PREAMBLE AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, the Baptists of North Carolina now in convention assem- 
bled are opposed to all wrong-doing of whatever character; 

And Whereas, one Mr. Roberts has been elected to the Congress of 
the United Slates; 

And Whereas, the said Roberts is understood to be a polyganiist 
having three wives: 

And Whereas, polygamy is subversive of moralitj' and a menace 
to the public good as well as contrary to the laws of the United States: 
therefore be it 

Resolved, T hat we. the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
desire to express our disapproval of tlie said Roberts's manner of life, 
and re{[ue t that the Congress of the United States do not permit the 
said Rolierts to take his seat. 

J. C. Blasingame (:)ffered the report on Education, Minis 
terial and General, as follows : 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL AND GENERAL EDUCATION. 

It is gratifying to report that the Board of Education is out of debt. 
This is the first time it has been able to so report. The number of stu- 
dents rei eiving aid have been increased from thirty-one last year to 
forty this year. 

1 hert' are many hopeful signs of a greatly increased interest in Gen- 
eral Education. Wake Fore.st College has now 2Q0 students, fifteen 
more tiian at the .same time last year. The Baptist Female University 
opened its first term on September 2Tth. and has issued 180 matricula- 
tion cards. Notwitlistanding tliis large attendance it is a notable fact 
that Oxford Seminary and the Cliowan Baptist Female Institute have 
each a much larger attendance this j^ear than last. Tliese last two in- 
stitutions have been the only female colleges Baptists could claim and 
depend upon for the education of our young women, and we are glad 
to see that the opening of the University has been simultaneous with 
an increased attendance in these two worthy institutions. Our people 
should take this as a verification of the scriptural declaration that to 
him that hath shall be given. 

We are glad to report the founding of tJiree Associational sc-hools 
since the last Convention, viz.: The Sylva High School. Jackson 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 75 

County; Bowman Academy, Bakersville: and Fruitland Institute, Hen- 
derson County. Mars Hill College reports an increased attendance of 
thirty. 

We would emphasize the importance of establishing Associational 
High Schools in every Association in the State. 

Jas. C. Blasingame, Chairman. 

T. E. Skinner, 

R. L. Moore, 

J. L. Lake, 

W. B. Waff, 

E. J. Harrell. 

Committee. 

John Mitchell, Corresponding Secretary of the Board of 
Education, presented the annual report of the Board, which 
was ordered printed in the Minutes. 

REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1899. 

The work of the Board of Education during the year has been fairly 
prosperous, and is encouraging. Contributions have been a little bet- 
ter than last .year. All outstanding obligations have been cancelled. 
The current expenses have been paid to December 1, 1899, and we are 
glad to be able to report that the Board of Education is out of debt. 

The work of the Board, always important, but never more so than 
now, is growing upon us, and the Board has decided to increase the 
number of its beneficiaries to forty, with the hope that the contribu- 
tions will justify the increase. The number aided last session is thirtj^- 
one. The number received this session to date is thirty-six, and we 
shall doubtless reach forty during the next term, and it is hoped that 
we shall be able to aid all the worthy young ministers who may apply. 
The aid usually given is $9 per month, and this not a gift, but a loan to 
be returned after five years without interest. If not paid within the 
five years the notes after that will draw four per cent interest. The 
first of the notes became due a fevv months ago, and some of them have 
been paid. 

The annual account of the Corresponding Secretarj- from December 
5, 1898. to December 3, 1899, shows the following : 

DEBITS. 

Received from J. D. Boushall. Treasurer $2, 458. 72 

CREDITS. 

Balance due on last year's account $6. 78 

Paid out during the j'ear, as per receipts _ 2, 4-35. 45 

Ca.sh in haml to balance - - -' 16. 49 

3, 458. 72 



76 MINUTES OF THE 

The above account itemized has been audited and certified as follows: 

" I have carefully examined the above account of Dr. John Mitchell. 
Corresponding Secretary of the Board of Education of the North Caro- 
lina Baptist State Convention, beginning December 5, 1898. and end- 
ing December 2. 1899, and find them correct and properh^ vouched, 
with a balance of sixteen dollars and forty-nine cents ($16 49) in hand.'" 

J. M. Brewer, 

Auditor. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. L. POTEAT. 

John Mitchell, President. 

Cor. Sec'y. 

Remarks were made b}"" John Mitchell, C. E. Taylor, and 
R. T. Vann, after which the report was adopted. 

J. S. Hardaway reported having sent to the North Caro- 
lina men in the Seminarv the o-reetings of the Convention, 
citing II Thess. i. 11, 12. 

Thomas Hume offered the following resolution, which, 
after remarks by Thomas Hume, J. D. Hufham. and J. C. 
Caddell, was adopted : 

Renolved, That the Convention recommend the Baptist Historical 
Papers, the valuable quarterly of the Xortli Carolina Baptist Historical 
Society, publif:hed at Henderson, North Carolina, by brethren J. D. 
Hufham and T, M. Pittman. at $1.00 per year, to all who are interested 
in the careful search for truth anil in the permanent record of the best 
results. It must be sustained by Baptists for their own sake while they 
thus advance God's own truths. 

J. B. Carlyle offered the following resolution, which was 
adopted : 

Resolved. That tiie hearty thanks of tliis Convention be extended to 
the pastor and members of the First Baptist Church of Asheville and to 
the people of this beautiful mountain city for their unstinted iiospitality; 
to the different churches of the city for the tender of their pulpits on 
the Sabbath; to Mr. Geo. W. Vanderbilt for an invitation to visit his 
magnificent estate, and to the railroads of the State for reduced rates. 

On motion of J. B. Carlyle, the Secretaries are allowed 
the usual compensation, and instructed to have the usual 
number of minutes printed. 



BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION. 77 

J. M. White, for the committee, submitted the following 
report, which was adopted : 

REPORI ON OBITUARIES. 

Eleven of our honored bretlircn have died since the meeting of tliis 
Convention last ye^ir in Gracav le. Extended notices of all these good 
bretliren would n ^ka a repor% oolongto be spread upon .the minutes of 
this Convention. Your coinmittee therefore present the following 
brief report : 

Whereas, The Great Head of the Church has, in His inscrutable 
wisdom, seen fit to removs from the vineyard of Christ on earth to the 
2)lace He has prepared tor His people in heaven, the following beloved 
bre*>iren, namely: !f.ldjrs J. H. Lamberth, G. W. Mace, J. W. Ander- 
:?on, William Parson?, W. E. Hensley, J. B. Poole, W. T. Jones, Laurel 
Hill, Virginia, J. O. Robertson, Rock Hill, South Carolina, J. N. Hog- 
£;ard, G. W. Sanderlin. D.D., LL.D., C. J. Nelson, and brethren J. H. 
Mills, W. S. Grandy; therefore, 

Ecsoh''ed Ist, Tiiat we hereby express our gratitude to God for giving 
us in the lives of these brethren gifts and influences that have greatly 
nelped in tiie Master's work, and that we are also thankful for the good 
a ^complishe>! through the instrumentality of these brethren while they 
were with us on earth. 

Resolved 2nd, That the profound and heartfelt sympathy of tliisbody 
be extended to the families of these brethren and to the churches from 
whicii they were taken. 

F. H. Jones, 
J. M. White. 
H. A. Brown, 

W. R. GV\^\LTNEY, 
J. D. HUFHAM, 

E. Allison, 

Committee. 

On motion of N. B. Broughton, the State Board of Mis- 
sions and Sunday Schools is requested to incorporate a list 
of our deceased brethren in their report. 

Adjourned to meet to-morrow evening for the closing 
exercises of the Convention. 



78 MINUTES OF THE 

FIFTH DAY— Sunday Evening. 

At the conclusion of the sermon to night by W. C. Tyree, 
President Marsh called the Convention to order, and made 
appropriate closing remarks. He was followed by J. A. 
Stradley and T. E. Skinner. 

On motion of Livingston Johnson, the Convention then 
adjourned to meet in Raleigh at 7.30 p. m., on Wednesday, 
December 5, 1900. 

R. H. MARSH, President. 

N. B. Broughton, 

HiGHT C. Moore, 

Secretaries. 



APPENDIX 1. 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS. 



Ahernatby, J. W., Matthews. 
Adams, G. W., P'air Plains. 
Adams, E.J , Richmond Hill. 
Adams, J. O , Wadesboro. 
Adams, M. A., Cary. 
Adams, M. H., Venable. 
Adams, J. J., Clinton. 
Adderton, W. S., Denton. 
Alderman, J. O , Raleigh. 
Allen, \V. M., Fletcher. 
Allison, E , Brevard. 
Aman, D. F , Marines. 
Aramons, J. A., Need more. 
Ammons, Job', Outlook. 
Anderson, E. F., Transom. 
Anderson, C.J. F., tiertford. 
Angel, James J., Boonville. 
Annas, J. R. J , Monbo. 
Arrington, T. F. , Cowarts. 
Airington, C. C, Shelton. 
Atkinson, J. W , Nense. 
Austin, D. M., Charlotte. 
Austin, J. H., Rockingham. 
Avers, W. A., Bethel.' 

Bailey, L.J , Walnut Run. 
Bain, G. A., Buies Creek. 
Baldwin, M., Huntsville. 
Baldwin, T. M , Rise 
Baldwin, J. R , S las Creek. 
Ball, C. T., Spring Hope. 
Ballard, W. S , Clarkton. 
B Jlard,J. M ,D)olie. 
Barker, A. N., Grade. 
Birker, H. M., Peachtree. 
Barker, W F., Bud. 
Barnes, S. D , Boomer. 
Barnes, S. B , Lewiston. 
Barnes, K., Sterling. 
Barrett, W. C, Raleigh. 
Barron, A. C , Charloite. 
Bdrr, J. vS , Pinckton. 
Barrett, E. B., Peachland. 
Bartlett, G. A , Franklin. 
Bassett, J. E , Asheville. 
Beach, J. J , Mi)ravian Falls. 
Beach, W. R , King's Creek. 
Beam, J. A., Bethel Hdl. 
Beamer, W. H , Pine Ridge. 
Beard, C. E , Winnie. 



Beaver, C. E., Mt. Holly. 

Beeker, S. J , B lonvllle. 

Beck, A. W., Calhoun. 

Bell, J. W , Clinton 

Bennett, J. .Iredell. 

Bennett, J. L., Marshville. 

Bennett, J. M., Churcbland. 

Betts, Alvin, Raleigh. 

Betts, A. L., L')uisville, Ky. 

Bilbro, W. L., Ayden 

Bivens, J. .\., Richardson's Creek. 

Blackburn, S , Rud. 

Black, C.J., Riy Lick. 

BIackaell,J. W.,Unaka. 

Blackwell, C. S , Wilmington. 

Blalock.J.C, Ledger. 

Blalnck, T. L., Chmg Kiang, China. 

Blalock, J. G., WMiteville. 

Blan-hard, C. W., Kinston. 

Bland, Wm , Hav.ley's Store. 

Blanton, J. C , Fancy. 

Blevins, Job 1, Heimitage. 

Blevins, B , .\bsher. 

Blevins, E., Blevins. 

Blevins, C, Ira. 

Blevins, S , Dehart. 

Boone, J. B., Thomasville. 

Boone, J. R , E^latoe. 

Booth, J. N., Greenville. 

Bordeaux, A.] , Dougbton. 

Bostick, W. M.,Troy. 

Bostic, G. P , Shanghai, China. 

Bostic, W. D., Rock Spring. 

Boyd, J. P , Polkton. 

Bradley, ]. A., Grnpe Vine. 

Bradley, W.T., Morgan Hill. 

Bradley, W. L , Harris. 

Bradshaw, E. T , Cora. 

Bra.lshaw, W. R , North Wilkesboro. 

Brantlev,J. P , Perth. 

Brav, G. N , Henderson. 

Bridgers, S. A. , Forest City. 

Bridges, B. M . Lalt more.' 

Bridges, D. P., Liucoliiton. 

Bridges, J. D , New H.tnse. 

Briggs H. W., B lid C-eek. 

Briggs,J. W , Mars Hill. 

Briggs, W. K , Briggsville. 

Bright, .A. , Soring Creek. 

Bright, T., Murphy. 



8o 



APPENDIX. 



Brindle.J. A,, Wake Forest. 
Brisson, Wni , Guylon. 
Britton, T. C , ^roo'Chow, Chiua. 
Bristow, S. F., Colerain. 
Briti, D. C, Piltsboro. 
BrittJ. L , Turkey. 
Brock, T. J., Ac on. 
Brooks, C V , Lemon Springs. 
Brooks, G. W., Brevard. 
Brooksbier, J. L , Flat Rock. 
Brown, Asa, Riverside. 
Brown, A. E , .^she^-ille. 
Brown, T. K , Black Mountain. 
Brown, J. W , Absher. 
Brown, C. C, H^mptonville. 
Brown, H. A , Winston. 
Brown, Joel, Elkville. 
Brown, \V. G , Cross Roads Church. 
Brunt, Wni , Winnie. 
Bryan, L , Cypress Creek. 
Bryan, R. T , Shanshai, China. 
Buchanan, C. S , Barker. 
Buchanan, J. W , Minneapolis. 
Buchanan,}. L , Barker. 
Buchanan, S , Plum Tree. 
Buchanan, W. S., Bakersville. 
Buchanan, E., Bakersville. 
Bumgardiier, A. P , Caesar. 
Bumj^aruner, W.J , Swanner. 
Burcham, G. M., Elkin. 
Burcham, A. J., Mt. Airy. 
Burcheir, J. W , Rouda. 
Butler, R. M , Wmlerville. 
Butler, A. A., Franklinton. 
Byrd.R. L, Tolarsville. 
Byrd, W. F , Trap Hill. 

Gaines, G.C.Orton. 
Caldwell, W. R . Robbinsville. 
Caldwell, Jno. W., Loreta. 
Cale, D , Potecasi. 
Callahan, N. A., White Hall. 
Calhoun, C. L , Medlin. 
Calhoun, T.J , Medlin. 
Calloway, J. ^I, Jefferson. 
Camp, T. C, Tusquitee. 
Campbell, .^. N., Buies Creek. 
Campbell, J. A , Hu:es Creek. 
Campbt-ll, N'eal, Thaxton. 
Carroll, R. D., Smyrna. 
Carroll, S. T., St<3nv Fork. 
Carroll, L. R , Warsaw. 
Carrick, Thoma*, High Point. 
Carlton, W. F., Reddies River. 
Carswell, Z , Enola. 
Carter, I. M , Bernice. 
Carter, Henry, Garland. 
Carter, T. S., Palestine. 
Cashwell. C. S.', Shelby. 



Cashwell, J., Bladenboro. 

Cassiday, \V. A., Trail Branch. 

Cau lie, A. B,, Wiiigate. 

Caudlr, R.T., Rockingham. 

Caudle, J. J., Dockery 

Chafin, M. S , Calahan. 

Chambers, S. .\., Wavnesville. 

Chappell, W.Y , Flint 

Chappell, L. N , Milton. 

Cheek, F. B , Wfiitehead. 

Church, G. H., Burlington. 

Church, J. W., Reedv Branch. 

Clark, D.J , R giste'r 

Clark, F. P., Djgwood. 

Clark, M. L., Morganton. 

Clark, N. L , Chambers. 

Clarke, J. D.,St. Paul's. 

Clayton, Clubh, Sexton. 

Clement, A. B , Bushness. 

Clennv, L. M., Silver. 

Cloavland, F. L., Chapel Hill. 

Cobb, N. B , H irrell's Store. 

Cobb, J. W., Lumber Bridge. 

Coleman, A., Murp!iv. 

Colev, W.J.,Norlhsrde. 

Collie, D. S., Brvson Citv. 

Collius,J. W, Polk. 

Comer, J. Q , Hamptonville. 

Comer, W. T. , Lovel ice. 

Compton, ^L C . Clyde. 

Couner, W. E., Quailatowu. 

Conra<l, S. F , Cliarlotte. 

Conwav, W. W., Baton. 

Cook.H. B , Medlin. 

Cook.J. H. Lark. 

Coppedgr, G. W., Wakefield. 

Corn, A. J., Grange. 

Corn, Noah, Little Creek. 

Corpeuiiig, J. S , Washington. 

Cothren, Grant, Trap Hill. 

Cowan, G. N., Edenton. 

Craig, B., Tarboro. 

Cree, A., Littleton. 

Cree, A. C , So. Bap. Theo. Seminary. 

Creech, Worley, Micro. 

Crews, R. W , Germanton. 

Crisp, J. F., Lenoir. 

Crisp, E. D., Upton. 

Cri^p, R. H., Dorsey. 

Croom, H. M , Pearl. 

Cross, R. D., Ahoskie. 

Croxton, A. M., Monroe. 

Grumpier, J. C, Hope Mills. 

Gullom, W. R., Wake Forest. 

Cunningham, H. A., Swain. 

Current, J. M., Buck Shoal. 

Curtis, L. M., Aulander. 

Daitz, T. F , Barker. 



APPENDIX. 



Davenport, J. E. M., Coiiijock. 

Davis, A., Low Gap. 

Davis, W. H.Troy. 

Davis, A. C, Olive Brauch. 

Davis, A. W., Barker. 

Davis, J. F , Paliiierville. 

Davis, J. F., Tavlorsville. 

Dehart,T.S., Swain. 

Dennis,J. D. Polk. 

Denton, J. R., Dysartsville. 

Devennv, J. v., Buies Creek. 

Devin, R.I .Oxford. 

Deweese, E. A., Murphy. 

Deweese, L , Ouilook. 

Deweese, W. W , Burningtown. 

Dietz, J. 8., Pearson. 

Dietz, T: P., Dillsboro. 

Dixon, L. R., Goldston. 
I Dixon, T , Shelby. 
' Dobsoii, J. H, Atkinson. 
I Douglass, J. J., Clinton. 
5 Dovvell, G. J., Lumberton. 

Dowell, J, Jennings. 

Downev, J. W , Buchaiian. 

Duke, G. M., Dukes. 

Duncan, T. M , Beaver Creek. 

Duncan, J. W., Ledger. 

Duncan, H.J , Clinton. 

Dunn, W. C , Balsam Grove. 

Durham, C. H., Asheville. 

Earl, J. M., Swain. 
Early, D. VV., Aulander. 
Edmundson, John T., Littleton. 
Edwards, A. A., Winnabow. 
Edwards, D. D., Durham. 
Edwards, E. J., Southport. 
Edwards, J. R , Swain. 
Edwards, O. T., Mt. Vernon Springs. 
Edwards, W. H , Durham. 
Elam, P. R., Kings Mountain. 
Ellen, M. H., Durham. 
Eller,J. F., Sweet Water. 
EUer, G. VV., Jefferson. 
Ellington, E. P., Reidsville. 
Elliott, Josiah, Hertford. 
Enslev,"W , Dillsboro. 
Eudy,'G. L., Efird's Mills. 

Farthing, C. S., Hattie. 
Farthing, J. H., Hattie. 
Farthing, R. M., Bakersville, 
Felmet,C. F , Waco. 
Fender, A., Laurtlton. 
Ferrebee, J. B., Elizabeth City. 
Ferrell, B.S., Waxhaw. 
Fields, C. F.,Elkin 
Finch, G. L., Carthage. 
Fisher, J. G., Roslin. 
6 



Fleetwood, J. C , Margarettsville. 
Fontaine, P, H., Bethel Hill. 
Ford.T. W .Ellijay. 
Forester, J. A., North Wilkesboro. 
Fox.E. L.,Slar. 
Franklin, J. K , Devotion. 
Freeman, F. M , Logan's Store. 
Frisbie, T. J., Spring Creek. 
Furgersou, P. F ,Lanibsville. 
Fulford, W. J., Rockingham. 
Fuqua, S. W., Engle Springs. 

Galloway, J. A., Wolf Mountain. 
Gallowav, J. E , Galloway. 
Gentry, S. E , Dobson. 
Gibbs', N. H , Benson. 
Gilbert, R. H., Plymouth. 
Gillam, E. R., Drew. 
Gilmore, S., Goldstou. 
Glenn, W.H.,Grigsby. 
Glidewell,C. W.,Tuttle. 
Goforth, M. A , Big Pine. 
Gnforth,S. S , Lovelace. 
Gooden, A. H , Brvantsville. 
Gordon, J. .H., Avertll, Va. 
Gormlev, M., Aquone. 
Gosnell,'G. W., Owenby. 
Gough, D. A., Bandana. 
Gourley, Robert, Winston. 
Gower, C. E , Clayton. 
Graham, H. W., Swann Station. 
Greaves, C. L., Rockingham. 
Grav, W. F., Buck Shoal. 
Gray, W. T., Marler. 
Green, David, Norris 
Green, B. P., Mooresboro. 
Green, J. B , Forest City. 
Green, J., Boiling Springs. 
Green, R. G., Hamptonville. 
Green, Solomon, Stony Fork. 
Greent- , G. W., Canton, China, 
Greene, Edmund, Norris. 
Greene, L. H , Bakersville. 
Greene, D. A , Bakersville. 
Greene, M. L , Ahoskie. 
Greene, S. M., Bakersville. 

Greenwood, , Paint Rock. 

Griffin, J. Z., Baton. 
Griffin, J. W , Dallas 
Grindstaflf, I , Bakersville. 
Grizzard, R. W., Wallace. 
Gulledge, J. G , Brown Creek. 
Gwaltney,J. P., Mt. Pisgah. 
Gwaltney, H. H., Vernon. 
Gwaltney , J. S. , Cora. 
Gwaltney, L. P , Vashti. 
Gwaltney, W. R., Hickory. 
Gwyn, E. N., Buck Shoal'. 



82 



APPENDIX. 



Hackney, J. D., Franklinville. 

Hackney, J. A., Greensboro. 

Haganiau, J. P., Boone. 

Haglenian, J. G., Sweet Water. 

Haithcock, U. F., Albemarle. 

Haire, P. H , Fleetwood. 

Hall, J. W., Havesville. 

H.all, W. F., Idaho. 

Hall, S. \V., Sandy Ridge. 

Hamilton, L. C , Bowman's Bluff. 

Hamilton, R. F., Knight. 

Hamrick, W. C , Flats. 

Hoke, B. L.Kings Mountain. 

Holland, G. W , Winston. 

Hollar, E. , Felts. 

Hollar, I , Eupeptic Springs. 

Holleman, J. M., Ape.K. 

Hollifield, A. P., EHenboro. 

Honeycutt, G. A , Whitley. 

Honeycutt, R , Beamau's X Roads. 

Honeycutt, T. M,. Mars Hill. 

Honevcutt, W. H., Concord. 

Hooker, W. H , Marshall. 

Hooper, G. W , Robbinsville. 

Hooper, L. W., Tuckaseigee. 

Hopper, P. G , Isa. 

Hopper, C. F., Clinton. 

Hord, A. T., Cleveland. 

Horner, K. C, Harper's X Roads. 

Horner, T. J., lleudersou. 

Horrell,R. W.,St. Paul. 

Horton, O. C , East Durham. 

Howard, H. H., Bee Log. 

Howell, W.T , Wake Forest. 

Howell, I. K , Rocky Mount. 

Hoyle.J. A , Maiden. 

Hoyle, B. M., Estatoe. 

Hudgins, Richard, Pump. 

Hudson, T. J., Ching Kiang. 

Hudson, D. J., Bessie. 

Hufhani,J.D , Henderson. 

Hughes,;., Byrd. 

Hughes, S. A., Vallev. 

Hull, W. F., Camp Creek 

Hume, Thos., Chapel Hill. 

Hunt, A., Gamble's Store. 

Hunter, A. D , Cary. 

Hurley, A , Thaxton. 

Humphries, T.J , Bethel Hill. 

Hutchinson, J. H., Hutchinson's Store. 

Hamner, W. H , Lexington. 

Hamrick, F. C, Pump. 

Hamrick, D. M., Rutherfordton. 

Hamrick, G. P., Boiling Springs. 

Hardaway, J. S., Oxford. 

Hare, H., Gap Creek. 

Harman, A. J , Harman. 

Harman, D. C, Sugar Grove. 



Harman, G. W., Ramseur. 

Harman, J. M., Sugar Grove. 

Harnley, A. H., New Bern. 

Harrill, H. D , Forest City. 

Harrell, F'. J., Aulander. 

Harrell, W. B.,Dunn 

Harrell, J. B., Magnolia. 

Harrelson, H., Gaddysville. 

Harrill, Z. D., Ellenboro. 

Harrill, E. D , Ellenboro. 

Harrill, G. P., Murfreesboro. 

Harrington, E. P., Mission. 

Harris, B. B., Dyartsville. 

Harris, D. J., Yanceyville. 

Harris, D. P , Ebzabeth City. 

Harris, J. M,, Dogwood. 

Harris, Wm., Knapp's Mills. 

Hartley, D. C, Minneapolis. 

Hartseil, J. W., Morven. 

Hartsell, P. G., Concord. 

Hawkins, .A. B., Leicester. 

Haw'kins, R. M , Sharon. 

Hay more, C. C, Mt. Airy. 

Hay more, R. D., Mt. Airy. 

Haynes,J. M., Clyde. 

Hayues, W., Asheville. 

Hedgejjeth, I. P., Lumberton. 

Hedgept-ih, R. A., Autryville. 

Hefner, D., Lenoir. 

Henderson, G. W., Blaine. 

Hensley, S. B , Bee Log. 

Henson, A. B., Balsam. 

Herring, D. W. , Ching Kiang, China. 

Herring, R. H., Wilmington. 

Hewiit, D. L., Shallotte. 

Hice.J. H , Baton. 

Hilburn, D. H , Bladenboro. 

Hilburn, L. W., Freeman. 

Hilburn, Rufus M., Bladenboro. 

Hildebiand, A., Pearson. 

Hildreth, J. H., Wilmington. 

Hill, A. H.,Cotlonville. 

Hill, T. B., So. Bap. Theo. Sem. 

Hilliard,J. M , High Point. 

Hocutt,J.C., Graham. 

Hocutt, J. E., Nashville. 

Hodge,;. F., Pool. 

Hoge, B. Lacy, Concord. 

Hogue, G. F., Boonville. 

Ingram, H. M., Pekin. 
Irwin, A. C, Pearl. 
Isaac, E., Lineback. 
Israel, L. Y. , Dunsmore. 

Jackson, Elbert, Turner's. 
James, R. H., Reuben. 
Jamerson, Wm., Rest Haven. 



APPENDIX. 



83 



Jamison, Wesley, Bald Creek. 
Jarvis, R. F., Adlev. 
Johnson, C. C, Reose. 
Johnson, L , Greensboro. 
Johnson, Wni. R, Vshe. 
Johnson, R. K , Ed >\'ards X Roads. 
Johnson, S. H., Grav's Creek. 
Johnson, L. E , Fremont. 
Johnson, J. B , Walnut Cove. 
Jolly, J. R., Loniax. 
Jones, E. F. , Ziousville. 
Jones, J. R., Royal. 
Jones, R. H , Ai. 
Jones, Wm. H., Blue Ridge. 
Jones, W. J., Estatoe. 
Jones, W. M , Wadesboro. 
Jordan, F. M., East Fork. 
Jordan, J. R., Franklin ville. 
Jordan, James, Franklinville. 
Jordan, S , Robbinsville. 
Jordan, W. P., Hertford. 
Jordan, Y., Osboriisville. 
Justice, A. A., JElna. 
Justice, T. B., Rutherfordton, 
Justice, A. I., Fruitland. 
Justice, C. B., Rutherfordton. 

Kane, E. F., Good Spring. 
Kanot, J., Robbinsville. 
Kesler, M. L , Rocky Mount. 
Keeler, S. J., 
King, J. D , Wampler. 
King, R. W., Wampler. 
King, T. CRiceville. 
King, W. G., Villauow. 
Kinsland, J. L , Roan Mt. 
Kirk.J. T.,Trap Hill. 
Knight, W. F., Blowing Rock. 
Kuykendall, J. A , Leicester. 
Kuykendall, W. I., Alexander. 

Lancaster, J. F. , Oak Ridge. 
Lancaster, W. D., Sandy Springs. 
Lane, J. L., Summerfield. 
Lanning, Jeff., Denton. 
Landsell, J. J , Roxboro. 
Larkins, J. D , Kenansville. 
Latta, A. T., I\Ionroe. 
Lawhon, W. H. H , Lawhon. 
Lawing, J. W. , Peachtree. 
Leach, M. J., Lassiter. 
Leatherman, J. F., Hull's X Roads. 
Lee, W. F., Tiptop. 
Lee, W. M., Summit. 
Lee, M. L., Ashepole. 
Leggatt, B., Windsor. 
Leggett, R. J., Howelville. 
Lennon, J. P., Applewhite. 



Lewellyn, J. H., Dobson. 

Lewis, C. H , Gamble's Store. 

Lewis, L. G. , Pennington. 

Lewis, Joseph, Gage. 

Lewis, J. L., Laurelton. 

Lewis, John, Clavton. 

Lilly, Edraond, King's Creek. 

Limrick, R. L , Shelbv. 

Little, J. W , Lane's Creek. 

Little, T. P., Marshall. 

Littleton, J. W. , Palestine. 

Livingston, D. K., Little Pine Creek. 

Lloyd, L. A., Nashville. 

Loftis, R. M., Culler. 

Long, W. H , Ayr. 

Logan, J. H., Excelsior. 

Loudermilk, D. P., Bridgewater. 

Lynch, J. W., Wake Forest. 

Macomson, M. V., Graham. 

Manly, H., Brevard. 

Marcus, W. A., Homestead. 

Morgan, B. L. , Homestead. 

Morgan, D. A , Spring Creek. 

Morgan, E. J, Candler. 

Morgan, F. M., Flats. 

Morgan, S. J., Morgan Hill. 

Morgan, W. C, Robbinsville. 

Morriss, H., Palmerville. 

Morton, D. S., Whitney. 

Morton, H., Thouiasvil'le. 

Morton, W. B., Roxboro. 

Morton, W. G , .Albemarle. 

Moss, T.J , Forest Citv. 

Moss, N. H.,Cherrv ville. 

Mull, W. B , Shoup's Ford. 

MuUinox, T. H., Grover- 

Mundy, J. A , Reidsville. 

Murchison, C. M , Penelope. 

Myers, I. T., So. Bap. Theo. Sem. * 

Myers, W. W., Round Mountain. 

Myers, D. R., Salisbury. 

Myers, T. C, Martin. 

Myers, A. A., Round Mountain. 

Myers, J. W., Round Mountain. 

Marley, H. C, Lenoir. 

Marsh, A , Marshville. 

Marsh, R. H , Oxford. 

Martin, C. H., Polkton. 

Martin, C. F., Murphy. 

Martin, J. H., Hamptouville. 

Martin, J. L., Creedmore. 

Martin, W. N,. Trail Branch. 

Marshburu, A. B., Nealsville. 

Mashburn, H. H., So. Bap. Theo. Sem. 

Mason, J. A., Conclave. 

Mason, W. C , Flats. 

Mason, B. K., Williamston. 



84 



APPENDIX. 



Mason, N.J , Louisville. 
Matthews, J. R , Hexlena. 
Matthews, B. H., Biltmore. 
Matthews, N. J., Pilot Mountain. 
Matthias, B., Buck Shoal. 
May, S. S.. AUgood. 
Mercer, T. J , Bolivia 
McCarsoii, J. L., Hendersouville. 
McClure, \V. B., Alexis. 
McDevitt, P., Mars Hill. 
McDufEe, J. F. , Rock Springs 
McGinuis, I. J., Banners Elk. 
McGugan, C. P., Lumber Bridge. 
Mcintosh, C. M., Clement. 
McKaughau, J. A., Albemarle. 
McKinney, C. H., Bakersville. 
McLeudon, J. J., Wolfsville. 
McLeod, D., Selma. 
McLure, W. H., Henrietta. 
McLure, W. B., Alexis. 
McMahon, A., Forest City. 
McMillan, D. C , Ashepole. 
McNeil, M , Wilkesboro. 
Meadows, W. C. , Poor s Knob. 
Meeks, O. P, Clinton. 
Mellon, W. H., Kapp's Mill. 
Melvin, W. A., Harrell's Store. 
Melvin, W. S., Winnie. 
Merrell, G. L , Hohgood. 
Metcalf, C. C, Briggsville. 
Michael, Ray, Nettle Knob. 
Miles, John A , Leicester. 
Miller, Daniel L , Highlands. 
Miller, I. C, Summit. 
Miller.Jno. R., Fair Grove. 
Milliken,C., Ash. 
Milliken, H., Ash. 
Mints, J. A.,Shallotte. 
Mitchell, John, Wake Forest. 
Mitchell, S. W., Asheville 
MofBtt, J. I.. Stone Mountain. 
Montague, E. J., Allensville. 
Moore, S. F , Fairview. 
Moore, H. C, New Bern. 
Moore, I. F., Lynch. 
Moore, J. O, Hunting Creek. 
Moore, R. A , Red Springs. 
Moore, R. R., (ireensboro. 
Moore, J. D , Red Springs. 
Moore, J. R., So. Bap. Theo. Sem. 

Naylor, M. W., Giles Mills. 
Nelson, E R., Henderson ville. 
Nelson, J. H , Patterson. 
Newell, G. W., .Mapleville. 
Newton, W. C, Goldsboro. 
Newton, I. T. , Brevard. 
Newton, J. B , Aulander. 



Newton, J. D., Thomasville. 
Newton, H. F., Casar. 
Nichols, W. E., Tracadia. 
Noble, J. W , Willard. 
Norris, H. W., Cosma. 
Norris, Isaac, Cruso. 
Norris, John, Sweet Water. 
Nort<)^i,J. H , Vf uabic. 
Nowell, W. C, Nashville. 

Olive, W. S., Apex. 
Oliver, P., Daltou. 
Ollis, W. H.,Plum Tree. 
Oneil.G. G., Neuse. 
Orr, G. W., Robbinsvile. 
Orrell, N. B, Abbotts Creek. 
Osmeut, J. R., Dallas. 
Overby, R. R., Belcross. 
Overton, W. C, Harrelsville. 
Owen, S.C, Candler. 
Owen.J.C, China. 
Owen, J. L , Highlands. 
Oxford, Isaac, Cedar Valley. 

Pace, J. R, Oxford. 
Page, S. C , Godwin. 
Page, Wiley M., Falcon. 
Palmer, R. L. , Leander. 
Parks, E. L., Lisbon. 
Parker, C.J. D., Durham. 
Panther, J. P., Quallatown. 
Pardew, A. T., Wilkesboro. 
Paris, T. W., New Castle. 
Parish, ^L E. , Salisbury. 
Patton, R. L., Morganton. 
Paul, C. B., Swansboro. 
Payne, J. M., Blowing Rock. 
Payseur, J. J.. Wilmington. 
Peek,I.T.,Cullasija. 
Pendergrass, J. R., Franklin. 
Peebles, G.W.,Glady. 
Penick, W. S., Elizabeth City. 
Perkinson, L. C , Wise. 
Pernell, M. R , Franklinton. 
Peterson, C. D., Dalila. 
Phillips, John, Beech Creek. 
Phillips, Wm , Mt. Airy. 
Phillips, J. L., Houck. 
Phillips, J. B.,Collettsville. 
Pierce, E,. S , Pantego. 
Pinner, R., Faust. 
Pippin, A. A., Wakefield. 
Pitchford, J. A., Littleton. 
Pittman, A. R., Rennert. 
Pittman, A. E. C, Rennert. 
Piatt, J. T, Warne. 
Plemnions, James, Biltmore. 
Poe, E. A., Cora. 



APPENDIX. 



85 



Pool, E.Y., Bethel Hill. 
Pool, C. C.Partee. 
Pool, D. W., Vashti. 
Porter, S.J. , Morganton. 
Porter, W. F.,Dc'hart. 
Porter, C.W., Elm City. 
Porter, A. H , Orton. 
Poston, R ,Shelbv. 
Potter, W. J., Elk Park. 
Powell, J. W., Rocky Mount. 
Powers, J. H., Mt. Airy. 
Prevatt, F. A., Lumberton. 
Prevatt,John, Huntley. 
Prevvett, N.. Knob Creek. 
Privette, I. T., Wilkesboro. 
Proffit, M. S., Democrat. 
Pruett, L. R , Charlotte. 
Pruitt, Julius, Connelly's Springs. 
Pruitt, Berry, Knob Creek. 
Pruitt, G., Penelope 
Pruitt, Wui., Alice. 
Pugh, J. M., Randleman. 
Pulliam, J. G. , Lenoir. 
Putnam, J. W., Magnetic City. 
Putnam, D. F., Cherryville. 

Queen, A. C, Cowarts. 
Queen, B. N., Tuckaseigee. 
Queen, J. H., Brysou City. 
Queen, L. E., Cowarts. 

Ramsey, Garret, Marshall. 
Ramsbottom, C. F. , Chadbourn. 
Reaves, E. A , Statesville. 
Rector, J. A., Morganton. 
Reddish, W. H., Wilson. 
Redwine, J. F., Fork Church. 
Reece, J. N., Gallowav. 
Reed, W. W.,Balsam: 
Reid,T. M., Hughes. 
Reedy, E. W. , Crumpler. 
Reese, J. V., Cruso. 
Rhodes, J. R., Saluda. 
Rickard, D. V., Columbia. 
Rich, W. H., Thomasville. 
Rich,H. P.,Glady. 
Richardson, J. B , High Point. 
Rickman, P. R., Leatherman. 
Riddle, B. B., Pensacola. 
Riddle, H.B.,Big Pine. 
Riddle, J., Beaver Creek. 
Roberts, Creed, Berlin. 
Roberts, D. J, Cherry Lane. 
Roberts, D.J , Trap Hill. 
Robertson, W. A., Barnardsville. 
Rogers, M., Bushnell. 
Rollins, B. F., Elkin. 
Rose, J. W. , Goldsboro. 



Ross, A. M., Kings Mountain. 
Rowell,J. E.,Cleon. 
Rowell, S.J ,Cleon. 
Roy, W. H., Paint Fork. 
Royall, W. B., Wake Forest. 
Royal, F. M., Ching Kiang, China. 
Royal, R., Kelly. 
Ruppe, John, Byarsville. 

Sales, J., Mount Tabor. 
Sams, J. F , Cane River. 
Sandling.R.C, Clinton. 
Saunders, B., Lilesville. 
Scarborough, C. W., Murfreesboro. 
Scotten, A. K., Coleridge. 
Seagraves, W. M , Jonesville. 
Sears, D. R , Siler City. 
Segle, L. M., Spring Creek. 
Sellers, Lorenzo, Supply. 
Sentell, R. A.,Clyde. 
Settle, J. F., Byrd. 
Settlemyre, G. W. 
Setzer, A. W., Morehead City. 
Shaver, J. M., Dealville 
Shaw, J. A., Louisville, Ky. 
Sheets, Henrv, Lexington. 
Shell, P. J., Allamont. 
Shell, J. T., Petra Mills. 
Shell, L.C., Jonas Ridge. 
Shelly, N. A., Burgaw. 
Shepherd, J. J., Brindletown. 
Sherrill,T.C., Jumbo 
Sherwood, J. J. L , Yerger. 
Shinn, J. L., Mooresville. 
Shoaf, R. L., Linney. 
Shumate, James, Delphia. 
Silver, Thomas, Micaville. 
Simmons, S. F., Jonesville. 
Sims, A. H., Franklin. 
Simms, A. M., Raleigh. 
Skinner, T.E, Raleigh. 
Sledge,J. W.,Stal!ings. 
Sluder, M. M., Juno. 
Smiley, J. S , vSwain. 
Smith, A. B , Dillsboro 
Smith, James A., Fair Bluff. 
Smith, Forrest, Louisburg. 
Smith, J. E , So. Bap. Theo. Sem. 
Smitb,J.L., Siler City. 
Smith, W. A., West Durham. 
Snider, J. W^, Newell. 
Snider, S. J. , Matthews. 
Soles, J., Mount Tabor. 
Sorrels, J. C, Garden City. 
Sorrell, W. M.,Cary. 
Sothern, W. P , Asheville. 
Sparks, J. C, Bakersville. 
Speight, T. T., Lewiston. 



86 



APPENDIX. 



Speight, J. A., Ahoskie. 
SpenceJ. R.,Polk. 
Spence, J. P., Elizabeth City. 
Spilman, B. W., Raleigh. 
Sprinkle, A. J., Peek. 
Stallings, J. N., Salisbury. 
Stallings, N. P., Hertford. 
Stanley, A., Bliss. 
Stamev, E. A., Lineback. 
Stanley,;. P., Solitude. 
Stephens, M. A., Lumberton. 
Stewart, J. L., Clinton. 
Stoker, A. P., Denton. ' 
Stone, C. K., Haystack. 
Stough, A. L , Pineville, 
Stradlev.J. A., Oxford. 
Stringfield, O. L , Raleigh. 
Summev, J. .A., Hanner-jvijle. 
Suttle.J. W.,Smithfield 
Swaim, S. D., Mocksville. 
Swaim, V. M., Cross Roads Church. 
Swain, E. L, Shallotle. 

Tatum.E. F., China. 
Talbirt, W. T., Concord. 
Taylor, J. R., Wake Forest. 
Taylor, C. R., Wake Forest. 
Taylor, A. J., Chinquapin. 
Tavlor, C. E., Jefferson. 
Taylor, C. E., Wake Forest. 
Taylor, E. L. , Rutherfordton. 
Taylor, T.J. , Warrenton. 
Teeter, E. D., Locust Level. 
Tew,J.\V, Iredell. 
Tew, D.T., Clinton. 
Thomas, A. B., Silver. 
Thomas, C. A. G , Fayetteville. 
Thomas, I. W., Lenoir. 
Thomas, James, Ban<lana. 
Thompson, K., Low Gap. 
Tilley, George V., Winston. 
Thorn, J. B., Ferry. 
Toney, B. W, Sunshine. 
Townsend, J. T. , Carmichael. 
Treadway, E. R., Cove Creek. 
Tredwav, R. F. , Shelby. 
Trivett.'j. W., Dark Ridge. 
Tucker, Elihu, Bud. 
Turner, E. W., Trap Hill. 
Tuttle, J. F., Elizabeth Citv. 
Tyree.W.C, Durham. 

Utley,C.H.,Cana. _ 

Vannoy, W. H , Hampton ville. 
Vann, R. T., Scotland Neck. 
Vernon, J. H., Wake Forest. 
Vestal, M. M., Jonesville. 



Vines, J. F., Asheville. 
Vines, W. M., Asheville. 
Vinson, J. D., Cullasaja. 
Vipperman, J. H., Culler. 
Vipperman, J. L-, Newton. 

WafiF, W. B., Reynoldson. 
Walker, N., Newcastle. 
Wallen, Jesse, Marshall. 
Wallen, S., Big Laurel. 
Walton, M. C , Wilmington. 
Ward, W., Asheville. 
Ward, Benjamin, Marines. 
Watson, W. F., Gastonia. 
Watson, T. D., Dillsboro. 
Watson, J. W,, Chapel Hill. 
Weatherman, J. G., Jennings. 
Webb, G. M.,Shelbv. 
Wheeler, Z. W., New Light. 
Webster, G. B., Pactolus. 
Welborn, T. M., Trap Hill. 
Wells, C.G., Spencer. 
Welch, H. D , Balsam. 
West, J. H., Downsville. 
West, W. C , Fayetteville. 
Weston, E. L., Adams. 
Wheelous, Z. W., Grissom. 
Whisnant, E. S , Maiden. 
White, J. A., Tavlorsville. 
White, J. E., Raleigh. 
White, J. M., Apex. 
White, G. W., Rockyhock. 
White, M. P., Wilmington. 
Whitener, P. A , Morganton. 
Whiteside, Z. T., Uree. 
Whiteside, W. M., Rutherfordton. 
Whitlock, L. A., Silver. 
Wilcox, A. G., Brinkleyville. 
Wilcox, William, Todd. 
Wilcox, A., Caldv\ell. 
Wild, J. M., Walnut Run. 
Wild, J. R., Big Pine. 
Wilhoit, G. O , .Anson ville. 
Wilkins, W.E , Mars Hill. 
Williams, A. J., Kapp's Mill. 
Williams, B. B., Harrellsville. 
Williamsville, C. C , Royal. 
Williams, J. M., Clover. 
Williams, O. P., Robbinsville. 
Wilson, L. A., Sutherlands. 
Wilson, vSamuel, Bee Log. 
Wilson, W.H., Madison. 
Wood,T. G., Belcross. 
Wood, E. M , Cisco. 
WoodrufiF, C. E , Hickory. 
Woodson, C. J., Shelbv. 
Woodward, J. S., Needmore. 
Wooten, E. W., Clarkton. 



APPENDIX. 



87 



Wooteu, F. T. , Saleniburg. 
Wright, N., Lark. 
Wright,;. W., Felts. 
Wright, T. S , Rockingham. 
Wright, W. L.,Trov. 
Wyatt, W.J., Perth. 



Yarborough, A., Lexington. 
Younce, Jacob, Cowarts. 
Yoder, S. B., Franklin. 
Young, A. W , Scaly. 



APPENDIX 



ON 

On 

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APPENDIX. 



89 



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£ J; !ii o 

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90 



APPENDIX. 



NUMERICAL STATISTICS. 






bo 






a 


u 




^ • 


OJtfi 










o c 




' IT 


^ o 




ifiC 


t^i-n 


ir: bfl 








J '^^ 


•::? 






s •- 

0.^ 


3 ° 



Alexander 

Alleghany and Grayson l 

Ashe County 

Atlantic 

Beulah 

Bladen 

Brier Creek 

Brushy Mountain 

Buncombe .- 

Caldwell 

Cape Fear and Columbus 

Carolina 

Catawba River 

Cedar Creek 

Central 

Chowan 

Eastern 

Elkin 

Flat River 

French Broad 

Green River 

Haywood 

Kings Mountain 

Liberty 

Liberty and Ducktown 

Little Ri-er 

Mecklenburg and Cabarrus- 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Mt. Zion 

New Found 

Pee Dee 

Piediiiont 

Pilot Mountain 

Robeson 

Raleigh 

Sandy Creek 

Sandy Run 

South Fork 

South River 

South Yadkin | 114 

Stanly 79 

Stone Mountain 28 

Stonj' Fork 40 

Tar River 522 

Tennessee River 262 

Three Forks 152 

Transylvania 86 

Tuckaseigee 323 

rnion ' 157 

West Chowan 520 

Western North Carolina 98 

Yadkin I 226 

Yancey 73 



Total 18, 521 



2,328 I 
373 



1,087 



24 
40 
II 
iS 
25 
33 
62 
26 
48 
57 
41 
31 
65 
80 
181 

9 

64 



9 


1,234 


28 


31 


2,762 


44 


7 


816 


10 


iS 


1,851 


33 


26 


3,304 


32 


16 


1,44s 


18 


33 


3,306 


26 1 


22 


2,03s 


26 i 


37 


3,089 


59 


22 


2,784 


33 ! 


8 


1,557 


29 


13 


1,780 


15 


32 


3,326 


26 


.so 


7,765 


53 


70 


6, 122 


61 



97 


.3'^ 


48 


43 


22 


9 


27 


32 


13 


20 


71 


22 


46 


24 


67 


19 


8 


10 


no 


6s 


44 


16 


:^3 


22 


2S 


12 


60 


39 


77 


37 


105 


53 


30 


30 


36 


40 


49 


30 


80 


39 


73 


29 


31 
4 


20 

2 



41 


68 


68 


32 


47 


13 


25 

14 


J 04 
24 


29 

28 


21 


53 


41 


17 
103 


72 
128 


32 

88 


12 


27 


17 


19 
13 


51 
28 


32 
25 



1,231 

3,566 

3,225 

3,977 
1,780 

5, 278 

2, 2d4 

1,618 
• 183 

2,130 
2,407 

837 

5,247 

1,420 
2,397 
1,557 
3,902 
4.285 
5,156 

3, '49 

4, noS 
3,^43 
2, 171 
2,092 
I,6oH 

69S 
942 

7,711 
1, 86s 
2,728 
1,491 
3,898 
3,130 
9,415 
1.753 
3,020 
2,366 



18 

34 

26 

38 I 

17 

33 

24 

23 

24 

22 

27 

15 

42 

21 

28 

17 
41 
40 
50 
37 
24 
35 
31 
29 
19 



78 


32 


35 


42 


32 


30 


15 
41 


9 
36 


30 

47 


12 
18 


22 


20 


34 

23 


31 
8 



2,637 1,506 154,811 1,605 904 



24 


14 1 


8 


16 


4 


1 ' 


9 


9 


2 


12 


26 


15 


16 


22 


16 


15 


6 




2 


3 


39 


II 


29 


4 


7 


II 


II 


4 


7 


II 1 


16 


4 


2 


10 j 


9 


■3 1 


9 


I i 


6 


17 1 


14 


2 ! 


10 


6 


6 


22 


7 


3 


13 
7 
10 


2 


I 


4 





9 


I 


14 


2 


14 


7 


14 


8 


2 


3 


10 


7 


16 


I 


7 
7 
7 


3 


6 


6 


10 


26 


6 


10 


27 


8 


10 


I 


7 


12 


12 


7 


5 


10 


1 


12 


12 


5 


10 


8 


15 



124 '539 



APPENDIX. 



91 



SUNDAY SCHOOL STATISTICS, 1899 



Associations. 



o -a 

U CB «i 

5§ 



J I' SS 

1-^ §s 



Alexander 

Alleghany and Grayson* 

Ashe* 

Atlantic 

Beulah . 

Bladen 

Brier Creek 

Buncombe 

Caldwell 

Cape Fear and Columbus 

Carolina 

Catawba River 

Cedar Creek 

Chowan 

Eastern 

Elkin 

Flat River 

French Broad 

Green River 

Ha J' wood 

Kings Mountain 

Liberty 

Libertv and Ducktown 

Little River 

Mecklenburg and Cabarrus 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Mt. Zion 

New Found 

Pee Dee 

Piedmont 

Pilot Mountain 

Robeson 

Raleigh 

Sandy Creek 

Sandy Run 

South Fork 

South River 

South Yadkin 

Stanly 

Stone Mountain 

Stony Fork 

Tar River 

Tennessee River 

Three Forks 

Transylvania 

Tuckaseigee 

Union 

West Chowan 

Western N. C 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



253 
47 
50 
78 

110 
63 

256 



47 
'93 
575 
165 



<n 

u 

'-'3 

SV. 



463 



1,989 

278 

553 

677 
i,Si6 

644 
1,716 
1,222 

542 
1,987 
4,235 
1,509 



476 



2,242 

■325 
603 

755 
1,926 

716 
1,960 
1,222 

589 
2,180 
4,8io 
1,674 



I834. 00 



29.00 
75.00 
], 38 J. 00 
6.00 
17.00 



65.00 
734. 00 
159-00 
301.00 



$16.00 



43.00 
23.00 



296. 00 
61.00 
i5. 00 



7?. 00 
658. 00 
728.00 
327.00 



u "u 

gcx 



2bo 
370 



552 
994 



434 
2,483 
4, 264 



1,845 



2,037 



793. 00 



211 
67 
217 
102 



I2g 

153 

78 
46 

298 



1,629 
I, 106 

2,371 

1, 114 
619 

986 
1,253 

7-9 

390 

2,755 



1,840 
1,173 
2,588 

I,2l6 

619 

1,105 
1, 106 

867 

438 

3,051 



164.50 

174.00 



215.00 

185. 00 



6.00 
39-00 



187.00 
100.00 
24.00 
68.00 
373- 00 
1 1 9 . 00 
66.00 
815.00 



177 
137 
292 
177 
243 
77 
155 
152 



",575 

1,594 

3,597 

1, 222 

2,485 

449 

1, 123 

1,429 

1,781 

1,204 

658 

418 



71 
62 
169 
158 
442 
34 
147 



4,903 

900 

1,496 

715 

2,383 

■,529 

3,325 

399 

i,54« 



1,752 
1,731 
3,889 
1,399 
2,728 

526 
1,278 
1,582 
1,939 
1,339 

746 

469 

441 
5, 4.56 

900 
1,567 

777 
2, 552 
1,682 
3,767 

433 
1,695 



287. 00 
1,650.00 



320. 00 
380. 00 



840.00 
41.00 
33.00 



2, 382. 00 
62.00 



193.00 
152.00 
42.00 



763. 00 



6.00 
1, 140.00 



9.00 
28.00 
4.00 



168.00 
264.00 



32.00 
120. 00 



1,527 
2^328 



2,060 
i,3'o 



672 
2,990 



3,946 



925 

3,574 



1,021 
.1,059 



5,844 
"1^038 



',312 
3,805 



990 ' 6,808 



67,243 



8, 609. 00 



9,575.00 



55,071 



*Churches reporting no Schools — Alleghany and Grayson, 12 ; Ashe, 28 



APPENDIX. 



HISTORld 



Place of Meeting. 



Rogers' X Roads. Wake County 
Reeves Chapel, Chatham County 
Cartledge's Creek, Richmond Co- 

Cashie. Bertie County 

Union Camp Ground.^Rowan Co- 

County Line, Caswell County 

May'sChapel, Chatham County- 
Brown's, Sampson County 

Grassy Creek, Granville County- 
Johnston Liberty, Johnston Co-- 
do 



Recording Secretaries. 



Greenville, Pitt County Patrick W.Dowd R S.Blount 



do N. G. Smith- 

Wm.P. Biddle A.J. Battle 

do Amos J.Battle -- 

Alfred Dockery do 

do James McDaniel- 



.._do do 

-—do do — 

do do — 

do do -- 

do do -- 

--do du- 

Meherriii, Hertford County Thomas Meredith J. J. Finch 

Boiling Springs. Henderson Co-- do do 

Raleigh Alfred Dockery John B.White j|J 

do ' Thomas Meredith J.J. Finch 

do do do 

Fiiendship, Cumberland County-; Alfred Dockery N.J. Palmer 

Rockford, Surry County I do do 

Oxford James McDaniel do 

Louisburg do do 

Wilmington do do 

Smithfield do do 

New Bern do do 

Fayetteville ! do A. McDowell 

Warrenton do George W. Johnston _ 

Raleigh ] do J.B.Solomon 



Hertford do 

Raleigh do. 

Charlotte I do . 

Goldsboro ] do . 

Raleisjh do. 



do 

do 

do 

W.T.Brooks 
-do. 



-do i J.D. Hufham- 



_do T. J. Knapp Ass't Sec 

do 

do CE. Dunn, .Assistant 

do W. J. Palmer 

do r. M. Hushes 

J. L.Carroll, G.W.Sanderliu 

do do 



Wake Forest . 

Raleigh I do 

Warrenton 1 do 

Forestville do 

Raleigh do 

Wilmington do 

Goldsboro do 

Hillsboro ' Samuel G. Mason 

Vew Bern W.T. Brooks I do do 

Raleigh ^ do i do do 

Charlotte ; do ! N.B.Cobb, N. B.Broughton 

Fa3etleville ' do do do 

Warrenton i do | do C. M.Cooke 

Wilmington I J. M. Heck do F. R. Underwood . 

Shelby ' John Kerr J. D. Hufham, F. K. Underwood ... 

Raleigh | C. M.Cooke do do 

Durham . ' John Kerr do Wm. Bigg>< 

Charlotte '- , Wm. .A. Graham. Jr.- \Vm. Biggs, George W. Greene-.- 

Oxford 1 Needham n. Cobb do N. L Shaw 

Goldsboro ] dj j do N.B. Broughton 

Winston I do | do W.L.Wright 



1882 Warrenton 1 J.C.Scarborough 

1S83 Edenton 1 do 

Raleigh do 

1S85 Reidsville C.T.Bailey 

1886 Wilmington do 

Durham I W. H.Pce 

Greensboro ' do 

Henderson ' L.L.Polk 

I Shelby I do 

Goldsboro I R. H. Marsh 

1892 Raieigh do 

1893 Elizabeth City ; -do 

1894 Charlotte ' do 

1895 Greensboro do 

"1 Morganton ! do 

1897 ', Oxford > do 

"_" Greenville ' do 

1899 ' Asheville I do 



N. B. Broughton, N. L. Shaw. 



-do. 
-do. 
-do. 
-do. 
-do. 
do. 
-do 
-do. 
-do. 
-do. 
.do 
-do. 
-do. 
-do. 
-do. 
-do. 
-do. 



.do. 
do 

-G. W.Greene 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

-N. B.Cobb 4. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

.H.C. Moore 

do 

do 

do 



APPENDIX. 



93 



TABLE. 



Corresponding Secretary. 



John Armslrong 

.__.do 

do 

__do 

do 

do 

dn 

Wm. Hill Jordan 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do _— 

S. J. Wlieeier 

J. J. Finch 

do 

do 

J. J. James 

Wm. A. Sh.Tw 

Jolin H. Lacy--- 

do 

do 

A. McDowell 

T.S.Yarbrough _ 
W. M. Wingate-- 
do 



T.E.Skiuner 

A. J. Emerson 

do 

B.F.Marable 

None 

N. B. Cobb, Supt. Army Colp. and Miss 

do Miss, and Colp 

II do 

do Cor. Sec.S. S. Board 

W. T. Walters, Cor . Sec. State M iss. Board 

do Sec. State Miss. Board 

do do 

do do 

do 

T.D.Hufham 

. do 

do 

do 

T. B. Richardson 

: do 

do 

do 

None 

None 

John E. Ray 

do t- 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

C. Durham 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

John E. White 

_,..__do 

do 

do 

do 



Henry Austin 

do 

do 

Charles McAiister. 

do 

William Roles 

Amos J. Battle 

do 

do 

do-_^-- 

do 

do - 

James S. Purefoy— . 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



-do. 
.do. 
-do. 
.do. 
-do. 



do: 

do 

do 

S.S. Biddle 

James S. Purefoy 

do -.1 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do , — 

do 

do 

do 

John G. Williams 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

N. B Broughtoii 

Jordan Womble, Jr.._ 

B. F. Montague 

do 

do 

do 

do 

John T. PuUen 

do 

T.H.Briggs 

Fabius H. Briggs 

W. S. Grandy 

J.D. Boushall 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



Preacher of Introductory 
Sermon. 



Samuel Wait. 
John Armstrong. 
Wm. P. Biddle. 
David S. Williams. 
(Minutes mutilated.) 
John Kerr. 
John Armstrong. 

James S. Mims. 

John Armstrong. 

J. ]. Finch. 

Wm.Hill Jordan. 

J. J. Finch. 

EH Phillips. 

K.McNabb. 

G.M.Thompson. 

W. r. Brooks. 

J. S. Purefoy. 

David s. Williams. 

C. R. Hendrickson. 

John B.White 

Wm. Hooper. 

James McDaniel. 

K.I. Devin. 

A. McDowell. 

T. W. Tobey. 

(President reviewed history ol 

Convention.) 
T. E. Skincer, 
T.H.Piilchard 
J.S.Walthall. 
H. Petty 
John Mitchell. 
N. B. Cobb. 
(No record.) 

A. McDowell 

J. B. Hardwick. 

Jas. P. Boyce of S. Carolina. 

J.L.Carroll. 

John Mitchell. 

J.L.Carroll 

William Royall. 

W.M.Wingate. 

J.C.Hiden 

R.H. Marsh. 

C.T.Bailey 

H.A.Brown. 

T. W. Babb. 

(No record ) 

J. A. Mundy. 

R.H.Griffith. 

F.H.Jones. 

T. E. Skinner. 

H. A. Brown. 

A. G. McManaway. 

C. A, Jenkins. 

J. M. McManaway. 

R.T.Vann. 

H.W. Battle. 

B.Cade. 

J. S. Dill. 

T.H.Pritchard. 

Thomas Hume. 

J.S. Hardaway. 

J.W.Carter. 

T. J. Taylor. 

A.M. Sinims. 

J.B. Richardson. 

A.C.Barron. 

W.S. Penick. 

R.T.Vann. 



94 



APPENDIX. 



ASSOCIATIONAL TABLE. 



Association. 



Alexander 

Alleghany and Grayson 

Ashe 

Atlantic 

Beulah 

Bladen 

Brier Cieek 

Brushy Mountain .. 

Buncombe 

Caldwell 

Cape Fear-Columbus 

Carolina 

Catawba River 

Cedar Creek 

Central 

Chowan 

Eastern 

Elkin J 

Flat River 

French 3road 

Green River 

Havwood 

Kinsfs Mountain 

Liberty 

Libert v-Ducktown 

Little River 

Mecklenburg- and Cabarrus 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Mount Zion 

Neuse 

New Pound 

Pee Dee 

Piedmont 

Pilot Mountain 

Raleigh 

Robeson 

Sandv Creek 

Sandy Run 

Sojith Fork 

.South River 

South Yadkin 

Stanly 

Sto'ie Mountain 

Tar River 

Tennessee River 

Three Forks 

Transylvania 

Turkaseigee 

Union 

Western North Carolina 

West Chowan 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Place of Meeting. 



New Hope 

Buffalo 

.VIorehead City. 
Clement 



Zion Hill 

Rig Ivy 

Union, No i 

Spring Branch. 



.Mull's Chapel . 

Sharon 

New Hope 

Elizabeth City 
Mount Olive 



Roxboro. 



Dysartsville 



Double Spring 

Reeds Cross Roads . 



Benson 

1 2th Street Church, Charlotte. 
Bakersville 



Graham 
Antioch . 



Rockingham 

•L^herry Street, Greensboro. 

Leaksville --_ 

Baptist Centre 



Bethel 

Macedonia 

Eaton's 

Locust Level 

New Lisiht 

Spring Hope 

Bryson City 

Laurel Springs 

Brevard 

Head of Tennessee- 
Monroe 



. I Potecasi . 



. Sept. 27. 

Sept. 6. 

< ct. 9, 

Oct. 18. 

Aug 7. 

Nov. .«. 

Oct. II. 

Aug. 23. 

Aug. 14. 

Sept. 20. 

Oct. 25. 

Oct. II. 
I Oct. II. 

Oct. ;i. 

Oct. 9. 

Mav 22. 

Oct". 9. 

Sept. 25. 

July 10. 

.■\ug. 22. 

Oct. 4. 
; Aug. 2^. 

Sept. 20. 
j Aug. 21. 

Sept. 25. 

Nov. 1. 
I .\ug. 21. 
I Sept. 13. 

Oct. 18. 

Oct. 9. 

Oct. 23. 

Aug. 9. 

Oct. 25. 

Aug. 30. 

.\Ug. 2. 

Nov. I. 

Oct. 16. 
Oct. II. 
Oct. II. 
Oct. 25. 
Oct. 24. 
Aug. 30. 
Nov. 8. 
Sept. 20. 
Oct. 16. 
^ ug. 23. 
Aug. 28. 
Oct. i8. 
Aug. 16. 
Oct. II. 
Aug. 28. 
Oct. 30. 
Aug. 16. 



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